Nostalgic Artifacts

"Nostalgia isn't what it used to be."

- Peter deVries

 
Brownie Bottle Brownie Bottle Brownie Bottles Brownie Cartons J. C. Curtis Dairy Milk Bottle
Courtesy of Dave Spriggs ('64)
of VA - 11/13/03
Thanks, Dave!
Courtesy of Dave Spriggs ('64)
of VA - 11/13/03
Thanks, Dave!
Courtesy of Dave Spriggs ('64)
of VA - 11/13/03
Thanks, Dave!
 Courtesy of Dave Spriggs ('64)
of VA -
11/16/05
Thanks, Dave!
Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 11/20/03
Pal Ade Bottle Pal Ade Bottle Grapette Logo Grapette Bottle Grapette Bottle
Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 08/22/05
Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 08/22/05
Courtesy of Ron Miller ('59) of NC - 09/25/05
Thanks, Ron!
Courtesy of Ron Miller
('59) of NC - 09/26/05
Thanks, Ron!
Courtesy of Ron Miller ('59) of NC - 09/26/05
Thanks, Ron!
 
  Coca-Cola Straw Holder Orangette, Grapette, and Lemonette Pink Depression Glass from Spur Gas Stations Pink Fostoria Candy Dish
  November 17, 2003

Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 09/16/04

Courtesy of Ron Miller ('59)
of NC - 10/01/05
Thanks, Ron!
Courtesy Al Simms ('60)
of VA - 12/20/05
Thanks, Al!
 January 18, 2004

Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 12/20/05

Beginnings of My Fire King Jadite Collection Fire King Jadite Dishes Fire King Jadite Dishes Fire King Jadite Dishes Fire King Jadite Dishes
July 1990

Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 01/26/04

November 21, 2003

Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 11/21/03

November 21, 2003

Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 11/21/03

November 21, 2003

Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 11/21/03

Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 11/18/03
Fire King Opalescent Caramel Dishes Fire King Opalescent Caramel Dishes Fire King Opalescent Caramel Dishes Fire King Opalescent Caramel Dishes Fire King Opalescent Caramel Dishes
Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 11/19/03  
November 21, 2003

Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 11/21/03

November 21, 2003

Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 11/21/03 

November 21, 2003

Carol Buckley Harty
 ('65) of NC - 11/21/03

Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 11/19/03
Hammered Aluminum Hammered Aluminum Hammered Aluminum Hammered Aluminum Hammered Aluminum
Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 11/21/03
April 7, 1996

Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 11/21/03

August 18, 2001

Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 11/18/03

Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 01/26/04
Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 01/26/04
Jack's Salad Products - 1960s Jack's Salad Products - 1960s Ironing Sprinkler Oval Based Cradle Top Telephone 1937 Telephone
Courtesy of Dave Spriggs ('64) of VA - 11/19/03
Thanks, Dave!
Courtesy of Dave Spriggs ('64) of VA - 11/19/03
Thanks, Dave!
Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 01/26/04
Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC - 11/18/03
December 3, 1999

Carol Buckley Harty
('65) of NC  - 11/18/03

Attendant Memories

Brownie Soft Drink Coca-Cola Straw Holder

MY BROWNIE STORY
-or-
WHY I NEVER BECAME A SMOKER

I have always had more than a simple nostalgic connection
to Brownies - and I know precisely why.  Brownies are uniquely associated with an immensely important life lesson which I learned at a very tender age. The passing of years has clouded just how much of this story is first-hand recollection, and how much is attributable to hearing endless retellings of it by my grandfather, who played a key role in it.

It must have been in the early 50s, as I believe that I was maybe
5 or 6 years old. Granddaddy had taken me out in his car to go somewhere, but that is very foggy. Anyway, it was some errand, and he promised me that we would stop for a Brownie before returning to my grandparents' home on 47th Street.  Perhaps the stop was to be at Joe Milan's, because my mental picture is
of traveling north on Huntington Avenue.  It was all I could talk about; I loved Brownies.  I mean - chocolate and cold,
sometimes with little ice crystals having formed. I couldn't wait to get the business completed and wrap my little hands around that wonderful bottle, exactly like the ones you see on this page.

As curious and impatient little boys are wont to do, I had been "fiddling" with the cigarette lighter throughout the trip - repeatedly pushing it in and pulling it out of the receptacle and looking at the business end - even touching it. I had seen the glowing coils
in the lighter in my father's car, and, of course, fire is intoxicating to little boys.  I remember being surprised that Granddaddy had not told me to stop. Soon I was to learn why. 

I must have pushed it in a little too far, and, when I removed it, I touched it to the end of my index finger as I had done 20 times before.  Only this time I heard the sizzle, saw the smoke, and "FELT THE PAIN".  I let out a scream and began to cry; through the tears I could see that I had branded myself with the characteristic spiral of the lighter.  Granddaddy looked on with amusement - knowing that I had now learned the aforementioned "life lesson".  But, he just couldn't leave it at that.  Stifling a laugh, but not the hint of a smile, he asked if I still wanted to stop for the Brownie.  Through flowing tears and heaving chest, I replied, "No-o-o-o-o-o, Granddaddy, I just wanna go-o-o ho-o-o-ome."  "Are you sure? You really wanted a Brownie."  "No-o-o-o, Granddaddy, let's go ho-o-o-ome."

Ever since, I cannot see or even think about a Brownie without the end of my finger tingling.  But I don't play with car cigarette lighters, anymore.

- Dave Spriggs ('64) of VA - 01/26/04

 

 

Fire King Jadite Dishes

I first realized what an attachment I had to these dishes in 1988.  We decided to replace all our Tupperware dishes with glass.  With seven children in the house ranging from 18 to 1, I thought it best to purchase something inexpensive which could be replaced easily when the inevitable breakage occurred.  I thought I'd just go pick up these lovely green dishes.  They were, after all, my favorite color.  I soon found that they hadn't been manufactured since 1970. By that time, I REALLY wanted them anyway and the chase began.

Fortunately, we lived in Illinois at the time (long known as a haven for collectors), and Jadite dishes were still plentiful
in the right places.  So I began amassing a collection which now compares rather nicely with Martha Stewart's.

My only question was - which of my relatives had all that Jadite?  Not my mother, not my grandmother, none of my aunts; it was a mystery.  The last time I remember seeing any was in the cafeteria at the Pentagon in January of 1969.  It turns out I had a deep and abiding sentimental attachment to eating out.

Come to think of it, I still do.

- Carol Buckley Harty of NC - 11/22/03

Fire King Opalescent Caramel Dishes

It's not a long stretch to realizing why these dishes mean so much to me.  Their color is not really one of my favorites, and the intense shine borders on the gaudy.  But none of that matters; when I see them I dissolve into a puddle of sentimentality.

These were plentiful in our home as I was growing up, because they were offered as prizes at Buckroe Beach Amusement Park.

My favorite Arcade games were Pull the String and Duck Pond, so I played as often as my indulgent parents would allow.  As often as not, I  won a large Fire King opalescent caramel bowl.  This didn't seem to thrill me much then,
but it certainly would now.

- Carol Buckley Harty of NC - 11/22/03

Hammered Aluminum Jack's Salad Products
 

"Jacks Salads" is a product I grew up with and still to this day, other than my homemade, that was my favorite potato salad!!!  The owner, Jack Welstead is still living, and is in his 90's!!!   He is a member of Calvary!   I was in shock when I was told he was still with us!!  I remember his store that was on the corner of 48th and Huntington 1/2 block from Calvary!  Gad, the memories!  
I really believed we grew up in great times!

- Sarah Puckett Kressaty of VA - 01/25/04

Thanks, Sarah!  So we did!!

Grapette Sodas Tiny Sodas

My husband (Myles Hudson of the Class of 60, Warwick High School) wanted to know if anyone remembers the Grapette Soda which also was popular.

- Cathy Slusser Hudson ('64) of VA - 09/18/05

Thanks, Cathy - and yes, I certainly do remember the Grapette drinks!  They were delicious!

~*~*~*~*~*~

I have no recollection of Grapette. What was it??

- Dave Spriggs ('64) of VA -09/25/05

Oh, my goodness - I'm shocked! 
 
   Grapette was a grape carbonated soda, in competition with the carbonated grape "Tiny".  They were both in smaller bottles than the grape and orange Tru-Ades and Pals, which were noncarbonated.  Cathy Slusser Hudson's husband, Myles, raised the topic a few days ago.  I recall the Grapette more clearly than the Tiny (because I preferred it), but they were both delicious - far better than any grape soda currently on the market.
 
   I wish I had one now!

Thanks, Dave!

~*~*~*~*~*~

I saw some discussion about "Tiny", which is as unfamiliar as Grapette.  To be honest, Tru-Ade is equally unknown...

Sorry, somehow I never encountered these products. Remember, I was not in the area from 1955 - 1961.

- Dave Spriggs ('64) of VA -09/25/05

 You never had a Grapette??? How very sad! They were soooo yummy (must have been loaded with sugar!). Sodas do tend sometimes to be regional. It had forgotten that. It never occurred to me that you wouldn't be familiar with them.

~*~*~*~*~*~

Hi Carol -- attached are a couple of Grapette bottle pix you can add to the collection. And let's not forget "Orangette". Didn't see one often. I saw "Lemonette" very rarely. I didn't like them compared to Pal Ade. There was just something about carbonated Orange & Lemon that seemed to be against God's natural plan.  ;-)
 
Gray's Confectionary at the corner of 38th and Huntington almost always had Tiny, Grapette, and Pal in stock.

- Ron Miller ('59) of NC - 09/26/05

Oh, WOWZERS!!! I don't really remember the second bottle at all (perhaps it was a later version and that's one of the factors contributing to its demise???), but look at that first one - WOW! It had such an elegant, comforting shape to it. It felt so nice and happy in my hand - what a delight! It's such a treat just to see it again! (As you may have noticed by now, I'm very easily amused....)

Thanks so much, Ronnie! But it's too late. I have long since forgotten Orangette and Lemonette - SHEESH!  GIGGLES!!!
 

I think the grape drinks were called "Tinys", maybe because they were in such small bottles. 
They were wonderful and I always had a dime for one.  Wish we could find them?  : )

- Helen Flax Kierstead ('59) of Ontario - 09/21/05

Hey, Helen!  You may have something there!  I vividly remember the non-carbonated Pals and Tru-Ades, as well as the carbonated Grapettes (and of course the strangely wonderful chocolate Brownie drinks!) but there may also have been a carbonated grape drink called "Tiny"!  I can almost remember it.....

~*~*~*~*~*~

Helen Flax Kierstead ('59) of Ontario made reference to a grape drink by the trade name "Tiny" and I recall such a product. The only place I remember drinking them was in Salem, VA at the meat packing plant owned by my grandfather Keith. He had a drink cooler on the loading dock of Keith's Sausage for the employees to use during their breaks, and although it was a coin operated machine, it did not require a coin. The Tiny drink would get so cold that potions of it would freeze after taking the first drink, and that made it ever better.

- Joe Madagan ('57) of FL - 09/22/05

Thanks, Joe!

~*~*~*~*~*~

For Helen Flax Kierstead ('58) of Ontario -- you are right -- there were grape drinks called "Tinys". I never could decide whether I liked them or Grapettes or Pals the best. Believe me,
I drank them all -- as frequently as I could afford them!
:-)

As I recall, the Tinys and Grapettes were about the same size. The Pals were only slightly larger.


- Ron Miller ('59) of NC - 09/22/05

 Oh, yeah!!!  It's all coming back!  Thanks so much, Ronnie!

Pink Depression Glass from Spur Gas Stations

I note that in the Nostalgic Artifacts section there is no "Spur Glass."  Attached you will find a photo of three pieces that I have.  Just in case you don't remember what this is, We had SPUR gas stations in the area that sold gas for about 19 cents a gallon in the mid 50s and with your gas you got a piece of pink glassware or credits towards a larger piece.  Some of it is somewhat valuable today although I have no idea what my pieces are worth. 

- Al Simms ('60) of VA - 12/20/05

WOWZERONI!  What lovely pink depression glass!   I'll tell you what it's worth - a nice chunk-a money!  

   Thank you for sharing this image with us.  Pink depression glass is probably the most representative of all nostalgic artifacts, and the page was lacking without any.  I didn't include it for the simple reason that I've never collected it.  I collect so many other things, I decided to try to exercise some restraint and not start with this. 

I've only owned two pieces in my life, and one of those, a pretty tiny heart shaped candy dish, I gave away about five years ago to a dear friend who does have a nice collection of "the pink".
The other piece, a covered Fostoria Candy dish, I bought after I moved here to Fayetteville. I saw it in a second hand shop for about $3.00 or $4.00 dollars, and lost all that hard-earned restraint. I saw this identical dish going on eBay for $20.00 - which is still a bargain.

Ironing Sprinklers Oval Based Cradle Top Telephone
 

 

The dishes really brought back some memories.  Did you collect them or were they gifted to you?  So cool.

- Sarah Puckett Kressaty of VA - 01/25/04
Thanks, Sarah!

  I began most of my serious dish collecting in the late 80s.  I now seem to have, um, nine complete sets of dishes. 
Years ago my mother gave me her eight-place service "Miss America" cut glass by Anchor Hocking, and some lovely
etched glass service for six.  I found the Fire King pieces - Jadite green, opalescent caramel, and the ivory we use
for everyday (which will go to Joshua), largely a piece or two at a time at yard sales, auctions, and my beloved "junk" stores. 
My husband had bought my Haviland china service for six plus several completion pieces in 1979, and my aunt Alice gave me six
more place settings to match in 1984.  These will go to Lewis.  In the late 90s I found some gorgeous peacock blue glass dishes
and matching goblets at an auction, which Nathaniel long ago claimed as his.  In 2000, Paul's aunt gave us his grandmother's
huge collection of Narumi china in the "Silver Pine" pattern.  This set has already been tagged with Adrienne's name,
so I have to ask her permission to use it!  From 1999 to 2002 I picked up a set of cobalt blue glass dishes, serving
bowls, goblets and salt, pepper, and sugar shakers for $1.00 a piece from Dollar General Store of all places. 
Some of these will go to Randolph, others to Adrienne.  I think I just seem to have a thing for setting tables!

 "Miss America" Glass
by Anchor Hocking
"Forever Spring" China
by Haviland
"Silver Pine" by Narumi Cobalt Blue Glass Cobalt Blue Glass
      Monday, April 28, 2008 Friday, December 05, 2008
01/25/04 01/25/04 01/25/04 08/21/08 02/09/13

- Carol Buckley Harty of NC - 01/25/04, 08/21/08, 02/09/13


Carol,

Thank you for my (and Jimmy's) birthday Newsletter.

And it got me thinking ....

Have a look at this image. It is my mother ca. 1921. Note the rocking chair.    
 
And here is Mildred (Linkous Spriggs - '38 - 8 Mar 1921 - 4 July 2007) in August 1946 and very pregnant with me. Note the rocking chair.    
 

When my grandparents died, we obtained two things from the estate. One was my grandfather's 1952 Dodge, a tank of a car which I drove to NNHS for nearly 2 years.

It looked just like this, only not so clean ... and did not have the tricked-out wheels.    
 

The other thing was that rocking chair, which remained in my mother's home. With her death, it has now come to me, and while it is only a small piece of no antique value, you can understand that it holds great significance to me. I can recall as a tot, sitting at my grandmother's feet in that rocker, helping her shell sweet peas. My cousins also have similar memories surrounding that rocker. When something has come down through the Family over so many years, you cannot say that you own it. All you can say is that you are the temporary steward of it, and it is your responsibility to ensure its safekeeping and its eventual bequest to the Family.

- Dave Spriggs ('64) of VA - 08/19/08
Thank you so much for these charming images and that lovely story, David!


... I can't help but note color and texture changes of some things well familiar to me.  I was a Coke bottle baby and grew up drinking it.  When they came out with the "New" Coke and then slyly returned the original labeled as "Classic", I knew it was not the same.  Gone was the pungent bite it had and became too sweet.  Tootsie Rolls have also changed.  They use to be dark and more creamier texture full of rich chocolate flavor.  Now they seem pale and mealy textured.  Oh well, I will keep seeking out that elusive black pepper I remembered as a kid.

Guess it is like we seem to remember things differently as kids that don't have the same impact as adults.  When you are 3-feet tall everything seemed bigger and better.  When you are over 6-feet tall everything seems smaller (sometimes too small) and insignificant from what you remember.  Or how we just don't care as children about many things around us.  We played in the grass not worrying about ants and mosquitoes or anything else we may come across.  Now we take precautions to avoid those inconveniences.  All fall hand and hand. Ahhh.. the good old days!

- Eric Huffstutler (Bethel HS - '75) of VA - 05/06/09
Thanks, Eric!


NOTHING THAT CAME IN A GLASS BOTTLE TASTES THE SAME OUT OF A CAN...Ah those coca colas with the little ice crystals on top...on a hot summer day!  Candy bars were  A LOT BIGGER than they are now...also ice cream cones, my grandmother would send me to the store with a quarter and I would get us two Cokes and two candy bars and still come home with a nickel...which I was allowed to keep.  Real lemonade made with real lemons and sugar...porch swings...playing outside until dark...movies when there were only four theaters in town and they were all full on the weekends...people did not talk during the movie...if they did the usher would ask you to leave...movies were funny or sad but not depraved...family dinners on Sunday following church...these are the things that I loved and miss...

- Jean Poole Burton ('64) of RI -05/06/09
Thanks, Jean!


Hey Jean...  No truer words have been spoken!

My grandmother lived on Chestnut Avenue and there was a general grocery store down the street called Williams.  It had a deep chest soda cooler at the front door that had chilled water in it to keep the bottle drinks icy cold.  Nothing like a Chocolate Brownie soda on a hot summer day after riding on the handlebars of a bicycle to get there :-)
We have a porch swing at our house but doesn't seem the same.  As I mentioned, being smaller things looked and were bigger so a child of 6 years old could curl up on it and have a ride while a 52 year old man of 215 pounds and 6'4" can only get agitated after a few minutes of swinging.
 
Remember when people dressed up to even ride a bus downtown?  Women were in what today would be Sunday best including gloves to shop at a department store.  Now you have a bunch of casual dressed ... well, you get where I am going :-)
 
Even in the 70s I remember (but not often) going to the Newmarket rocking chair theater and staying all day for 50 or $1 - and by myself.  Other times were crouching down on the floorboard to hide from the teller at the drive-in so my parents wouldn't have to pay for me.  And enjoying the smells coming from that hypnotic neon island of light in the middle of nowhere.  Also the sounds of gravel beneath car tires and the movie echoing in the air.
 
And how about the Best Ever or Mister Softee trucks?  My stepfather drove a Best Ever for a while and you couldn't beat the REAL ice cream made with real heavy cream, packed in those little square half pint containers.  And the chocolate dipped soft serve cones from Mister Softee and the neon lights around the truck with its distinctive noise from the generator running.

Now I'm depressed :-)

- Eric Huffstutler (Bethel HS - '75) of VA - 05/06/09
Thanks again, Eric!


"Sentimental Journey" midi courtesy of http://gil_dano.tripod.com/Miscpage10.HTML - 11/20/03

Quotation courtesy of The Fayetteville Observer, 05/03/04

"Miss America" Plate by Anchor Hocking image courtesy of http://www.kaleden.com/detail,,428082.html - 01/25/04

"Forever Spring" China by Haviland image courtesy of http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3656161465&category=466 - 01/25/04

"Silver Pine" Plate by Narumi image courtesy of http://www.replacements.com/webquote/NARSIP.htm - 01/25/04

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