NNHS Faculty and Staff

UPDATED SECTION
01/08/12 Librarians
07/16/17 Teachers
11/10/17 Staff

 
 
  1926 Beacon
In the faculty section of the 1926 yearbook Miss Elma Free is listed as one of two Latin teachers.
The other is Mabel Barham. Teachers listed on the faculty in 1926 whom members of the classes
of 1955-1959 would remember are Annie Parker, English;  Herman Levy, math;  Louise Hurt, history;
Eli Leonard, Eline Krisch, Beulah Brasher, Commercial (we called that the Business Department);
Lalie Webb, Home Economics, Miles Thompson, Printing.
 
 
 

Row 1, seated: The man on the far left is Mr. Leonard. The big man in the middle with a man to the left and a woman to the right is the principal, Mr. Alexander. The woman seated on the first row second from the end on the right side of the picture I am sure is Miss Brasher.

Row 2, standing: Third from the left, with her hands behind her back and a cloche type hat, is Miss Annie Parker - “Annie” as some of us used to call her behind her back. The woman seventh from the left in row 2 with a white shirt and black scarf or tie in front, I am pretty sure is Miss Lalie Webb. Next to her is the one that I think is Miss Free. She’s wearing a dark dress with a white collar. What do you all think? Eleventh from the left in row 2, I think is Miss Ethel Gildersleeve. She was a math teacher at the time according to the faculty list. Then on the far right of row 2, standing at the end, behind the woman at the end of the first row, is Mr. Thompson, the printing teacher.

Row 3: Third teacher from the right, man with narrow face and not much hair on his head hair is Mr. Levy.

 


- Aretie Gallins Patterson ('59) of Northern VA - 10/07/05
WOWZERONI!!!  Thanks, Aretie!
 
 


I ... read your tribute to (Mrs. Shelton) viv-a-vis ODU and ENG101. Similarly, thanks
to Mrs. Wright and Mrs. Cameron, I validated Plebe English at USNA.
Given my tenuous academic record that year, the reading and writing load
of Plebe English would likely have resulted in my finding a different career path
than that of a Naval Officer. And THAT is why we have these "Teacher Pages" .....
to memorialize them and provide a forum in which former students may express
their gratitude and fond memories.
 

 
 
- Dave Spriggs ('64) of VA - 10/08/05
That's it exactly, Dave!  Thanks!
 
 
 


The English teachers I had were Mrs. Wright, Mrs. Cameron, Miss Parker ("Grannie Annie", as we called her behind her back), and Mrs. Graves. (Wasn't there for Senior year, so didn't experience
Miss Suttle or Mrs. Shelton.)

All were exacting. And we can all be thankful that NNHS had such teachers.

One of the first validations of the excellence of the NNHS education came totally out of nowhere
about 10 years after graduation. My wife and I were at a cookout visiting with friends 
in New England -- maybe 25 people there total. We knew no one there except the friends.

Sometime in the course of a discussion with a half dozen or so people, I made some comment (long since forgotten). A gentleman in the group then said something like -- "Not to change the subject, but
I am an English professor at Boston U, and you are the first person I recall ever using 'such-and-such' tense correctly in the course of normal conversation, as you just did. Your command of English is excellent." (Don't ask what tense -- I couldn't tell you a thing about the particular tense he mentioned even then!!)

Of course I was floored (and quite proud), but I did thank him and said all credit is due to my HS English teachers, who made sure we used the language correctly.

What is even more amazing is that I wasn't that good of an English student -- I was a math and science type. I guess the NNHS English teachers made us learn enough so that it stuck with us, whether we wanted it to or not.
 

 
 


- Ron Miller ('59) of NC - 10/10/05
Thanks, Ron!

 
 

 

 


"Education is simply the soul of a society as it passes from one generation to another."
 
- G. K. Chesterton


School Days

Words by Will D. Cobb
Music by Gus Edwards

School days, school days;
Dear old golden rule days.
Readin' and 'ritin' and 'rithmetic;
Taught to the tune of the hick'ry stick.
You were my queen in calico;
I was your bashful barefoot beau.
And you wrote on my slate,
"I love you, so,"
When we were a couple of kids.
Nothing to do, Nellie Darling;
Nothing to do you say?
Let's take a trip on memory's ship,
Back to the bygone days.
Sail to the old village school house;
Anchor outside the school door.
Look in and see;
There's you and there's me;
A couple of kids once more.
School days, school days;
Dear old golden rule days.
Readin' and 'ritin' and 'rithmetic;
Taught to the tune of the hick'ry stick.
You were my queen in calico;
I was your bashful barefoot beau.
And you wrote on my slate,
"I love you, so,"
When we were a couple of kids.

'Member the hill,
Nellie Darling;
And the oak tree
That grew on its brow?
They've built forty stories
Upon that old hill,
And the oak's an old chestnut now.
'Member the meadows
So green, dear;
So fragrant with clover and maize?
Into new city lots
And preferred bus'ness plots,
They've cut them up
Since those days.
School days, school days;
Dear old golden rule days.
Readin' and 'ritin' and 'rithmetic;
Taught to the tune of the hick'ry stick.
You were my queen in calico;
I was your bashful barefoot beau.
And you wrote on my slate,
"I love you, so,"
When we were a couple of kids.

 

"School Days" midi - 06/06/02

"School Days" lyrics courtesy of http://persweb.direct.ca/fstringe/oz/s512.html - 04/29/04

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