Virginians Killed or Missing in Action,
Vietnam Conflict

http://www.virtualwall.org/iStates.htm

- Ruth Ann Reece Horace ('67) of FL - 10/18/12
Thank you so very much, Ruthie!
 

Source: National Archives and Records Administration

Center for Electronic Records

http://www.nara.gov/nara/electronic/homensx.html

U.S. Military Personnel Who Died (Including Missing and Captured Declared Dead) as a result

of the Vietnam conflict, 1957-1995
 
Listed Alphabetically by Homestate, Homecity, and thereunder by Name as of November 1997

Mil. Military - Home of Record - Date of Place of Date of BNR

Name, Grade, Service, City or Town, State, Death * Death ,Birth ,Type of Casualty @

 

ABBOTT DAVID FRANCIS SP5 ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 02 NOV 69
S. VIETNAM 27 SEP 48 HOSTILE, KILLED

Posted for: DAVID FRANCIS ABBOTT

We were classmates from 1st grade at Woodrow Wilson through high school at NNHS.
I will never forget our 5th grade teacher, Mrs. Page's son, picking you up in front of the class.
He was a tall soldier then and you were so little. I heard that he was also killed in Viet Nam.
We remember you with fondness.

Posted on http://www.thevirtualwall.org by: Cheryl Mays Howard & John Howard ('66) of VA
Monday, November 25, 2002
06/19/04


ALLEN CHARLES ERVIN LCPL MARINES NEWPORT NEWS VA 17 APR 68
S. VIETNAM 27 FEB 48 HOSTILE, KILLED

ASHBY DONALD ROBERTS SR LCDR NAVY NEWPORT NEWS VA 19 JAN 67
S. VIETNAM 08 APR 30 NON-HOSTILE DIED-OTHER BNR

BAHR RICHARD DUNCAN 1LT ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 07 MAR 68
S. VIETNAM 28 SEP 44 HOSTILE, KILLED
 
BALL JAMES EDWARD III LCPL MARINES NEWPORT NEWS VA 04 JUL 67
S. VIETNAM 22 SEP 44 HOSTILE, KILLED
 
BANKS STERLING CLARK SP4 ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 04 MAY 68
S. VIETNAM 14 APR 45 HOSTILE, KILLED

BOONE WILLIAM EDWARD SSGT ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 19 FEB 68
S. VIETNAM 02 JAN 40 NON-HOSTILE DIED-ILL, INJ

BRANDON JAMES MILES JR PFC ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 17 MAR 67
S. VIETNAM 01 FEB 46 HOSTILE, DIED-WOUNDS

Posted for: JAMES MILES BRANDON, JR.

It has been 37 years since I last saw Jimmy, but his memory still lingers on and probably always will, until we meet again.
Jimmy and his family were always good friends during our years of growing up in Newport News.
From Pee Wee football to high school sports, Jimmy was an outstanding athlete and always had a great attitude and outlook.
 
 Here on this Memorial Day of 2002, I post my gratitude for having known Jimmy and want to express my appreciation for having him as a friend.

Posted on http://www.thevirtualwall.org by: Rip Collins ('65) of TN
Monday, May 27, 2002
06/19/04


BROWN WILLIE LEE PFC MARINES NEWPORT NEWS VA 19 MAY 67
S. VIETNAM 05 APR 48 HOSTILE, KILLED

CLAUD PERNELL RUSSELL SP4 ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 12 JUL 67
S. VIETNAM 15 APR 47 HOSTILE, DIED-MISSING

COOKE DOUGLAS RUDOLPH PFC ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 16 MAR 68
S. VIETNAM 18 DEC 45 HOSTILE, KILLED

CUNNINGHAM WILLIAM NEAL SGT ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 28 DEC 69
S. VIETNAM 08 APR 46 HOSTILE, KILLED
 
DIGGS MICHAEL RONELL LCPL MARINES NEWPORT NEWS VA 30 APR 68
S. VIETNAM 21 JUL 47 HOSTILE, KILLED

GIVENS ROY NATHANIEL SGT ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 29 JUL 69
S. VIETNAM 21 JAN 49 NON-HOSTILE DIED-OTHER

GROSHONG ALLEN EBERLY HN NAVY NEWPORT NEWS VA 08 APR 68
S. VIETNAM 11 FEB 48 HOSTILE, KILLED

Posted for: ALLEN EBERLY GROSHONG

I went to Woodrow Wilson Grade School with you and your older sister, Sarah, who is my age and was one of my good friends.
My fiancť graduated with you from Newport News High School.

Think of you often.

Posted on http://www.thevirtualwall.org by: Karrin Williams Frankie (WHS - '61) of VA and Joseph L. Dickson ('66) of VA
Monday, September 25, 2000
06/19/04
 
Posted for: ALLEN EBERLY GROSHONG

We were classmates from 1st grade at Woodrow Wilson through high school at NNHS.
I will never forget our 5th grade teacher, Mrs. Page's son, picking you up in front of the class.
He was a tall soldier then and you were so little. I heard that he was also killed in Viet Nam.
We remember you with fondness.

Posted on http://www.thevirtualwall.org by: Cheryl Mays Howard & John Howard ('66) of VA
Monday, November 25, 2002
06/19/04


GWALTNEY GERALD WAYNE PFC ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 23 FEB 69
S. VIETNAM 08 SEP 48 HOSTILE, KILLED

HIGDON RALPH TAYLOR CWO ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 03 OCT68
S. VIETNAM 04 MAR 16 NON-HOSTILE DIED-ILL, INJ

JAMES GENERAL FIRD JR SGT MARINES NEWPORT NEWS VA 02 JUL 67
S. VIETNAM 02 JUL 42 HOSTILE, KILLED

JARRETT STEVEN ANDREW 1LT ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 12 MAY 68
S. VIETNAM 05 JAN 45 HOSTILE, DIED-WOUNDS

JETER BENTON ARTHUR PFC MARINES NEWPORT NEWS VA 29 AUG 68
S. VIETNAM 09 FEB 49 HOSTILE, KILLED

JOHNSON CHARLES EDWARD SGT ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 29 APR 70
S. VIETNAM 03 JUL 37 HOSTILE, KILLED

JONES ORVIN CLARENCE JR LTC AIR FORCE NEWPORT NEWS VA 27 SEP 79
N. VIETNAM 17 MAY 39 HOSTILE, DIED-MISSING BNR
 
KOEHLER WILLIAM EDWIN PVT MARINES NEWPORT NEWS VA 16 MAY 68
S. VIETNAM 13 MAY 44 HOSTILE, KILLED

LANCASTER HERMAN JR CPL ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 25 SEP 70
S. VIETNAM 28 JUL 50 HOSTILE, KILLED

LENCHNER DAVID ALLEN 1LT ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 15 DEC 68
S. VIETNAM 24 AUG 47 HOSTILE, KILLED

MARTIN BUDDY RAY LCPL MARINES NEWPORT NEWS VA 10 JUL 67
S. VIETNAM 04 SEP 48 HOSTILE, KILLED

MC INTOSH RICHARD ROBERT SGT MARINES NEWPORT NEWS VA 20 AUG 69
S. VIETNAM 26 AUG 43 HOSTILE, KILLED

MURCHISON JAMES EMANUEL PFC MARINES NEWPORT NEWS VA 05 SEP 68
S. VIETNAM 29 JUN 49 HOSTILE, KILLED

MURRAY CHARLES EDWARD SGT MARINES NEWPORT NEWS VA 04 MAR 67
S. VIETNAM 26 OCT 43 HOSTILE, KILLED

PERDUE ROBERT DECKER PFC ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 24 FEB 66
S. VIETNAM 05 SEP 44 HOSTILE, KILLED

POOL CHARLES WINFRED JR PFC MARINES NEWPORT NEWS VA 02 MAY 69
S. VIETNAM 30 JUN 48 NON-HOSTILE DIED-OTHER
 
POWERS MONROE ALAN SP4 ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 13 NOV 70
S. VIETNAM 24 MAR 49 HOSTILE, KILLED

REED GARY ROBERT CAPT ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 11 FEB 69
S. VIETNAM 29 APR 45 HOSTILE, KILLED

ROBINSON JOSEPH LUTHER SP4 ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 24 FEB 66
S. VIETNAM 28 NOV 39 HOSTILE, KILLED

SAINT CLAIR ELISHA REEVES SSGT ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 23 NOV 70
S. VIETNAM 20 OCT 48 HOSTILE, KILLED

SHREWSBURY PAUL WAYNE PFC ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 11 MAR 69
S. VIETNAM 28 MAY 48 HOSTILE, KILLED

SLEMP FREDERICK ALBERT LT NAVY NEWPORT NEWS VA 24 FEB 66
S. VIETNAM 21 AUG 27 NON-HOSTILE DIED-OTHER

SMITH ROBERT LEE JR LCPL MARINES NEWPORT NEWS VA 04 MAR 66
S. VIETNAM 31 JUL 45 HOSTILE, KILLED

SNEAD DOUGLAS LEE LTC MARINES NEWPORT NEWS VA 28 DEC 69
S. VIETNAM 06 SEP 28 NON-HOSTILE DIED-OTHER

SPITLER FORREST F S SSGT ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 25 FEB 68
S. VIETNAM 03 MAR 25 NON-HOSTILE DIED-ILL, INJ

SUTTLE FREDERICK N JR CAPT ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 02 JUN 72
S. VIETNAM 27 MAR 45 HOSTILE, KILLED

SWANN JAMES CECIL SSGT AIR FORCE NEWPORT NEWS VA 04 MAR 68
S. VIETNAM 08 JUN 33 HOSTILE, KILLED

TOOMBS ALVIN CARNALL JR PFC ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 01 MAR 69
S. VIETNAM 27 AUG 48 HOSTILE, KILLED

VANN CARL REGINALD PFC ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 08 APR 69
S. VIETNAM 09 SEP 48 NON-HOSTILE DIED-OTHER

VIDALES ALEXANDER MSGT ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 22 FEB 67
S. VIETNAM 09 FEB 22 NON-HOSTILE DIED-OTHER

VINES CLEVELAND CPL MARINES NEWPORT NEWS VA 21 MAY 66
S. VIETNAM 02 AUG 39 HOSTILE, KILLED

WASHINGTON THOMAS MELVIN SP4 ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 01 JUL 68
S. VIETNAM 08 JAN 47 HOSTILE, KILLED

WHITE ROBERT ALEXANDER SP4 ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 07 FEB 66
S. VIETNAM 13 JUN 46 HOSTILE, KILLED
 
WILK JOSEPH ANTHONY JR HN NAVY NEWPORT NEWS VA 22 JAN 69
S. VIETNAM 02 MAY 47 HOSTILE, KILLED

 
WILSON REXFORD EARLE SP4 ARMY NEWPORT NEWS VA 02 JUL 70
S. VIETNAM 02 OCT 48 NON-HOSTILE DIED-ILL, INJ


 

GALLOWAY ARTHUR LEE JR 1LT ARMY WILLIAMSBURG VA 27 MAR 71
S. VIETNAM 14 APR 47 HOSTILE, KILLED

Posted for: ARTHUR LEE GALLOWAY, JR.:

Lee represented all that was good and right and beautiful in this country.
He was one of the finest young men I ever met, and I delighted in our friendship.
We went to different high schools, but we attended Trinity Methodist Church in Newport News together.
I was so proud and happy for him when he left for VMI, because his potential was so readily apparent
to all who knew him.

I shall never forget his gorgeous red hair, his glorious smile and his infectious laughter.
Nor shall I forget the shock I felt on learning of his death only days after it happened.

It had never occurred to me that Death could have claimed one so fair so soon in life, not him, not Lee.
Thirty-three years have passed since then, yet he's never really far from my mind.

I dedicated this page, which appears on both of my web sites, to Lee:
http://www.nnhs65.com/in-harms-way.html 

As Tina Turner said, "You're simply the best, better than all the rest, Better than anyone, anyone I've ever met."

He was the brother I never had, and I miss him still.

Virginia Military Institute Posted on http://www.thevirtualwall.org by: Carol Buckley Harty ('65) of NC
Tuesday, May 25, 2004
06/19/04 06/19/04



Dear Carol,

Reading your remembrance for your close friend, 1LT Arthur Lee Galloway Jr. on the vvmf.org Virtual Wall has prompted me to write and say thank you. 1LT Galloway and so many other wonderful heroes have given so very much to this great country.

May God bless you and yours and may He allow me to shake the hand of 1LT Galloway when I someday get to Heaven to personally say thank you.

With respect, and the best salute that a civilian can muster for your close friend, 1LT Arthur Lee Galloway Jr.

- Curt Carter (son of   SGT Ardon William Carter, 101st Airborne (born February 15, 1929), died February 4, 1966, South Vietnam) - 03/27/13

Thank you so much, Curt! I was out of state visiting family when your note came on the 42nd anniversary of his death,
but when dawn broke that Wednesday morning I thought (as I do every year), "Today is the day that Lee died."
He was quite simply the best of the best.




http://thewall-usa.com/




 
Carol,
This is perhaps too long for a newsletter but with your interest in the military, I thought that you might
find it interesting.  Most of this I already knew but had not see it all in one place before.  I cannot
vouch for the accuracy of every detail in it but I do know that most of it is correct and have no
reason to doubt the rest.  It came from a member of the NC Vietnam Veterans Yahoo Group.
 
- Al Simms ('60) of VA - 07/09/06
 
 
Vietnam War Facts:
Facts, Statistics, Fake Warrior Numbers, and Myths Dispelled

9,087,000 military personnel served on active duty during the
official Vietnam era from August 5, 1964 to May 7, 1975.

2,709,918 Americans served in uniform in Vietnam

Vietnam Veterans represented 9.7% of their generation.

240 men were awarded the Medal of Honor during the Vietnam War

The first man to die in Vietnam was James Davis, in 1958.  He was with the 509th Radio Research Station. 
Davis Station in Saigon was named for him.

58,148 were killed in Vietnam
75,000 were severely disabled
23,214 were 100% disabled
5,283 lost limbs
1,081 sustained multiple amputations
Of those killed, 61% were younger than 21
11,465 of those killed were younger than 20 years old
Of those killed, 17,539 were married
Average age of men killed:  23.1 years
Five men killed in Vietnam were only 16 years old.
The oldest man killed was 62 years old.

As of January 15, 2 004, there are 1,875 Americans still unaccounted for from the Vietnam War

97% of Vietnam Veterans were honorably discharged.
91% of Vietnam Veterans say they are glad they served.
74% say they would serve again, even knowing the outcome.
Vietnam veterans have a lower unemployment rate than the same non-vet age groups.
Vietnam veterans' personal income exceeds that of our non-veteran age group by more than 18 percent.
87% of Americans hold Vietnam Veterans in high esteem.

There is no difference in drug usage between Vietnam Veterans and non-Vietnam Veterans of the same age group. (Source:  Veterans Administration Study)

Vietnam Veterans are less likely to be in prison - only one-half of one percent of Vietnam Veterans has been jailed for crimes.

85% of Vietnam Veterans made successful transitions to civilian life.


Interesting Census Stats and "Been There" Wanabees:

1,713,823 of those who served in Vietnam were still alive as of August 1995 (census figures). During that same Census count, the number of Americans falsely claiming to have served in country was: 9,492,958. As of the current Census taken during August 2000, the surviving U.S. Vietnam Veteran population estimate is:  1,002,511.  This is hard to believe, losing nearly 711,000 between '95 and '00.  That's 390 per day. 
During this Census count, the number of Americans falsely claiming to have served in country is: 13,853,027. 
By this census, FOUR OUT OF FIVE WHO CLAIM TO BE Vietnam vets are not.

The Department of Defense Vietnam War Service Index officially provided by The War Library originally reported with errors that 2,709,918 U.S. military personnel as having served in-country.  Corrections and confirmations to this errored index resulted in the addition of 358 U.S. military personnel confirmed to have served in Vietnam but not originally listed by the Department of Defense. (All names are currently on file and accessible 24/7/365).

Isolated atrocities committed by American Soldiers produced torrents of outrage from anti-war critics and the news media while Communist atrocities were so common that they received hardly any media mention at all.  The United States sought to minimize and prevent attacks on civilians while North Vietnam made attacks on civilians a centerpiece of its strategy.  Americans who deliberately killed civilians received prison sentences while Communists who did so received commendations.  From 1957 to 1973, the National Liberation Front assassinated 36,725 Vietnamese and abducted another 58,499.  The death squads focused on leaders at the village level and on anyone who improved the lives of the peasants such as medical personnel, social workers, and schoolteachers.


Common Myths Dispelled:

Myth: Common Belief is that most Vietnam veterans were drafted.

Fact: 2/3 of the men who served in Vietnam were volunteers.  2/3 of the men who served in World War II were drafted.  Approximately 70% of those killed in Vietnam were volunteers.


Myth: The media have reported that suicides among Vietnam veterans range from 50,000 to 100,000 - 6 to 11 times the non-Vietnam veteran population.

Fact:  Mortality studies show that 9,000 is a better estimate. "The CDC Vietnam Experience Study Mortality Assessment showed that during the first 5 years after discharge, deaths from suicide were 1.7 times more likely among Vietnam veterans than non-Vietnam veterans.  After that initial post-service period, Vietnam veterans were no more likely to die from suicide than non-Vietnam veterans.  In fact, after the 5-year post service period, the rate of suicides is less in the Vietnam veterans' group.


Myth:  Common belief is that a disproportionate number of blacks were killed in the Vietnam War.

Fact: 86% of the men who died in Vietnam were Caucasians, 12.5% were black, and 1.2% was other race.  Sociologists Charles C. Moskos and John Sibley Butler, in their recently published book "All That We Can Be," said they analyzed the claim that blacks were used like cannon fodder during Vietnam "and can report definitely that this charge is untrue.  Black fatalities amounted to 12 percent of all Americans killed in Southeast Asia - a figure proportional to the number of blacks in the U.S. population at the time and slightly lower than the proportion of blacks in the Army at the close of the war."


Myth: Common belief is that the war was fought largely by the poor and uneducated.

Fact:  Servicemen who went to Vietnam from well-to-do areas had a slightly elevated risk of dying because they were more likely to be pilots or infantry officers. Vietnam Veterans were the best-educated forces our nation had ever sent into combat.  79% had a high school education or better.

Here are statistics from the Combat Area Casualty File (CACF) as of November 1993. The CACF is the basis for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial (The Wall): Average age of 58,148 killed in Vietnam was 23.11 years. (Although 58,169 names are in the Nov 93 database, only 58,148 have both event date and birth date.  Event date is used instead of declared dead date for some of those who were listed as missing in action)

Deaths Average Age
Total: 58,148       23.11 years
Enlisted: 50,274       22.37 years
Officers: 6,598       28.43 years
Warrants: 1,276        24.73 years
E1: 525        20.34 years
11B MOS: 18,465       22.55 years


Myth: The common belief is the average age of an infantryman fighting in Vietnam was 19.

Fact:
   Assuming KIAs accurately represented age groups serving in Vietnam, the average age of an infantryman (MOS 11B) serving in Vietnam to be 19 years old is a myth, it is actually 22.  None of the enlisted grades have an average age of less than 20.  The average man who fought in World War II was 26 years of age.


Myth: The Common belief is that the domino theory was proved false.

Fact: The domino theory was accurate.   The ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) countries, Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand stayed free of Communism because of the U.S. commitment to Vietnam.  The Indonesians threw the Soviets out in 1966 because of America's commitment in Vietnam.  Without that commitment, Communism would have swept all the way to the Malacca Straits that is south of Singapore and of great strategic importance to the free world.  If you ask people who live in these countries that won the war in Vietnam, they have a different opinion from the American news media.  The Vietnam War was the turning point for Communism.


Myth:  The common belief is that the fighting in Vietnam was not as intense as in World War II.

Fact: The average infantryman in the South Pacific during World War II saw about 40 days of combat in four years. The average infantryman in Vietnam saw about 240 days of combat in one year thanks to the mobility of the helicopter.   One out of every 10 Americans who served in Vietnam was a casualty. 58,148 were killed and 304,000 wounded out of 2.7 million who served.  Although the percent that died is similar to other wars, amputations or crippling wounds were 300 percent higher than in World War II.... 75,000 Vietnam veterans are severely disabled.  MEDEVAC helicopters flew nearly 500,000 missions.  Over 900,000 patients were airlifted (nearly half were American).  The average time lapse between wounding to hospitalization was less than one hour.   As a result, less than one percent of all Americans wounded, who survived the first 24 hours, died.   The helicopter provided unprecedented mobility.  Without the helicopter it would have taken three times as many troops to secure the 800-mile border with Cambodia and Laos (the politicians thought the Geneva Conventions of 1954 and the Geneva Accords or 1962 would secure the border).


Myth:  Kim Phuc, the little nine year old Vietnamese girl running naked from the napalm strike near Trang Bang on 8 June 1972...shown a million times on American television.... was burned by Americans bombing Trang Bang.

Fact: No American had involvement in this incident near Trang Bang that burned Phan Thi Kim Phuc. The planes doing the bombing near the village were VNAF (Vietnam Air Force) and were being flown by Vietnamese pilots in support of South Vietnamese troops on the ground. The Vietnamese pilot who dropped the napalm in error is currently living in the United States.  Even the AP photographer, Nick Ut, who took the picture, was Vietnamese.  The incident in the photo took place on the second day of a three-day battle between the North Vietnamese Army (NVA) who occupied the village of Trang Bang and the ARVN (Army of the Republic of Vietnam) who were trying to force the NVA out of the village.  Recent reports in the news media that an American commander ordered the air strike that burned Kim Phuc are incorrect.  There were no Americans involved in any capacity.   "We (Americans) had nothing to do with controlling VNAF," according to Lieutenant General (Ret) James F. Hollingsworth, the Commanding General of TRAC at that time.  Also, it has been incorrectly reported that two of Kim Phuc's brothers were killed in this incident.  They were Kim's cousins, not her brothers.


Myth: The United States lost the war in Vietnam.

Fact:
The American military was not defeated in Vietnam. The American military did not lose a battle of any consequence.   From a military standpoint, it was almost an unprecedented performance.  General Westmoreland quoting Douglas Pike, a professor at the University of California, Berkley a renowned expert on the Vietnam War).  This included Tet 68, which was a major military defeat for the VC and NVA.

THE UNITED STATES DID NOT LOSE THE WAR IN VIETNAM, THE SOUTH VIETNAMESE DID.  Read on........

The fall of Saigon happened 30 April 1975, two years AFTER the American military left Vietnam.  The last American troops departed in their entirety 29 March 1973. How could we lose a war we had already stopped fighting?  We fought to an agreed stalemate.  The peace settlement was signed in Paris on 27 January 1973. It called for release of all U.S. prisoners, withdrawal of U.S. forces, limitation of both sides' forces inside South Vietnam and a commitment to peaceful reunification.  The 140,000 evacuees in April 1975 during the fall of Saigon consisted almost entirely of civilians and Vietnamese military, NOT American military running for their lives.  There were almost twice as many casualties in Southeast Asia (primarily Cambodia) the first two years after the fall of Saigon in 1975 then there were during the ten years the U.S. was involved in Vietnam.  Thanks for the perceived loss and the countless assassinations and torture visited upon Vietnamese, Laotians, and Cambodians goes mainly to the American media and their undying support-by-misrepresentation of the anti-War movement in the United States.

As with much of the Vietnam War, the news media misreported and misinterpreted the 1968 Tet Offensive.  It was reported as an overwhelming success for the Communist forces and a decided defeat for the U.S. forces.  Nothing could be further from the truth. Despite initial victories by the Communists forces, the Tet Offensive resulted in a major defeat of those forces.  General Vo Nguyen Giap, the designer of the Tet Offensive, is considered by some as ranking with Wellington, Grant, Lee and Macarthur as a great commander.   Still, militarily, the Tet Offensive was a total defeat of the Communist forces on all fronts.  It resulted in the death of some 45,000 NVA troops and the complete, if not total destruction of the Viet Cong elements in South Vietnam.  The Organization of the Viet Cong Units in the South never recovered.  The Tet Offensive succeeded on only one front and that was the News front and the political arena.  This was another example in the Vietnam War of an inaccuracy becoming the perceived truth.  However inaccurately reported, the News Media made the Tet Offensive famous.
 
 
  - Al Simms ('60) of VA, himself a Vietnam veteran - 07/09/06  
Thank you, Al - for everything!



 
Interesting Veterans Statistics off the Vietnam Memorial Wall



"Carved on these walls is the story of America, of a continuing quest to preserve both Democracy and decency, and to protect a national treasure that we call the American dream." ~President George Bush


SOMETHING to think about - Most of the surviving Parents are now Deceased.

There are 58,267 names now listed on that polished black wall, including those added in 2010.

The names are arranged in the order in which they were taken from us by date and within each date the names are alphabetized. It is hard to believe it is 36 years since the last casualties.

Beginning at the apex on panel 1E and going out to the end of the East wall, appearing to recede into the earth (numbered 70E - May 25, 1968), then resuming at the end of the West wall, as the wall emerges from the earth (numbered 70W - continuing May 25, 1968) and ending with a date in 1975. Thus the war's beginning and end meet. The war is complete, coming full circle, yet broken by the earth that bounds the angle's open side and contained within the earth itself.

The first known casualty was Richard B. Fitzgibbon, of North Weymouth, Massachusetts, listed by the U.S. Department of Defense as having been killed on June 8, 1956. His name is listed on the Wall with that of his son, Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Richard B. Fitzgibbon III, who was killed on Sept. 7, 1965.


· There are three sets of fathers and sons on the Wall.

· 39,996 on the Wall were just 22 or younger.

· 8,283 were just 19 years old.

· The largest age group, 33,103 were 18 years old.

· 12 soldiers on the Wall were 17 years old.

· 5 soldiers on the Wall were 16 years old.

· One soldier, PFC Dan Bullock was 15 years old.

· 997 soldiers were killed on their first day in Vietnam.

· 1,448 soldiers were killed on their last day in Vietnam.

· 31 sets of brothers are on the Wall.

· Thirty-one sets of parents lost two of their sons.

· 54 soldiers on the Wall attended Thomas Edison High School in Philadelphia. I wonder why so many from one school.

· 8 Women are on the Wall. Nursing the wounded.

· 244 soldiers were awarded the Medal of Honor during the Vietnam War; 153 of them are on the Wall.

· Beallsville, Ohio with a population of 475 lost 6 of her sons.

· West Virginia had the highest casualty rate per capita in the nation. There are 711 West Virginians on the Wall.

· The Marines of Morenci - They led some of the scrappiest high school football and basketball teams that the little Arizona copper town of Morenci (pop. 5,058) had ever known and cheered. They enjoyed roaring beer busts. In quieter moments, they rode horses along the Coronado Trail, stalked deer in the Apache National Forest. And in the patriotic camaraderie typical of Morenci's mining families, the nine graduates of Morenci High enlisted as a group in the Marine Corps. Their service began on Independence Day, 1966. Only 3 returned home.

· The Buddies of Midvale - LeRoy Tafoya, Jimmy Martinez, Tom Gonzales were all boyhood friends and lived on three consecutive streets in Midvale, Utah on Fifth, Sixth and Seventh avenues. They lived only a few yards apart. They played ball at the adjacent sandlot ball field. And they all went to Vietnam. In a span of 16 dark days in late 1967, all three would be killed. LeRoy was killed on Wednesday, Nov. 22, the fourth anniversary of John F. Kennedy's assassination. Jimmy died less than 24 hours later on Thanksgiving Day. Tom was shot dead assaulting the enemy on Dec. 7, Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day.

· The most casualty deaths for a single day was on January 31, 1968 ~ 245 deaths.

· The most casualty deaths for a single month was May 1968 - 2,415 casualties were incurred.

For most Americans who read this they will only see the numbers that the Vietnam War created. To those of us who survived the war, and to the families of those who did not, we see the faces, we feel the pain that these numbers created. We are, until we too pass away, haunted with these numbers, because they were our friends, fathers, husbands, wives, sons and daughters. There are no noble wars, just noble warriors.

Please pass this on to those who served during this time, and those who DO Care.
 
 
   - Bill Hobbs ('66) of Northern VA - 10/08/11  
  Thank you, Bill - for everything!  



This page suggested by and data supplied by Cheryl Mays Howard ('66) of VA
(whose husband, John Howard - '66 - of VA, is a Vietnam veteran) - 06/09/04
Thanks, Cheryl - and John!




"Taps" midi, sequenced by Mark Weston, courtesy of http://www.laurasmidiheaven.com/Patriotic2.shtml - 06/10/04

Purple Heart clip art courtesy of Joe Madagan ('57) of FL - 06/04/04
Thanks, Joe!

Vietnam Wall image courtesy of http://free-stock-photos.com/ - 06/11/04

Flag and Eagle clip art courtesy of http://www.angelfire.com/ny4/KevsGifsGalore/Patriotic.html - 06/10/04

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