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11/11/09 - NNHS Newsletter - Veterans Day

“As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest
appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.”

- President John F. Kennedy
(29 May 1917 - 22 Nov 1963)

Dear Friends and Schoolmates,

    Today's theme repeats every year - as well it should:

http://www.nnhs65.00freehost.com/11-11-05-NNHS-Veterans-Day.html - featuring God Bless the USA

http://www.nnhs65.00freehost.com/11-11-06-NNHS-Veterans-Day.html - featuring The Washington Post

http://www.nnhs65.00freehost.com/11-11-07-NNHS-Veterans-Day.html - featuring The National Hymn

http://www.nnhs65.00freehost.com/11-11-08-NNHS-Veterans-Day.html - featuring The Battle Hymn of the Republic

BONUS #1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nJPUD57L7c - The Thunderer - The Vienna Military Brass Band - hmmm - A video made by a Frenchman of an American march played by an Austrian band... very nice images and old film clips

BONUS #2 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOlc8SVCN9Q - The Thunderer - the Parris Island Marine Band - a bit faster than I've ever heard it played

         A big Thank You to all you Veterans out there!


HOMEWORK (required viewing):

ASSIGNMENT #1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nP0Yhi2R4e8 - A montage  of images and clips honoring U.S. war veterans from World War I to present day - "America the Beautiful" - Lee Greenwood

ASSIGNMENT #2 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Skk6qm6MAK8 - Veterans Day Tribute

ASSIGNMENT #3 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43CMUBEmEO0 - Veterans Day Tribute

(extra credit):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veterans_Day

http://www1.va.gov/opa/vetsday/

http://www.patriotism.org/veterans_day/


THIS WEEK'S BIRTHDAYS:

   Happy Birthday tomorrow to Barbara Womble Lawson (NNHS / Hampton HS) of VA AND   Jean Pittman Priest ('64) of FL!

   Happy Birthday this week to:

14 -   Glenda Stewart Martin Faires ('68) of GA AND    Timothy of DC (son of    Kathy Cooper - '70 - of VA);

15 -    the late Bobbie Whitehurst Canady ('57) of VA (deceased 11/16/07) AND       My Niece, Shari, of VA;

16 -    the late George-Morewitz ('57) (deceased 06/09/08);

17 - Ronald Creech ('57);

18 -   Joe Drewry ('58) of VA AND    Jane Coltrane Leonard ('64) of VA AND   Ann Allen ('65) of NC!

http://www.nnhs65.00freehost.com/Happy-Birthday.html

   Many Happy Returns, One and All!


THIS DAY IN WWII:

November 11, 1942 - During World War II, Germany completed its occupation of France.

November 11, 1992 - Russian President Boris Yeltsin told U.S. senators in a letter that Americans had been held in prison camps after World War II. Some were "summarily executed," but others were still living in his country voluntarily.


THIS DAY IN 1964:

Wednesday, November 11, 1964 - Comedic actress Anabel Alonso was born in Baracaldo, Vizcaya, Spain.

Wednesday, November 11, 1964 - Actress Calista Flockhart was born in Freeport, Illinois.


    From Joe Madagan ('57) of FL -  11/09/09 - "Famous Sailor":

Hi, Carol:
I am mailing you a nice photo and article by
Bill Marriott entitled "I Started as a Geedunk Officer" which appeared in "Proceedings" from the U.S. Naval Institute.        Paul (Harty - Bardolph HS, IL - '61 - of IL) can fill you in on the naval term, "Geedunk."

I was a bit surprised that you do not have him listed in your Famous Sailor page, so maybe the article and photo will encourage you to consider him for this page.

TYPHOON Regards,
Joe Madagan ('57) of FL


   OOPS! How did I miss that one?!? Never mind; I've added him now!

http://www.nnhs65.00freehost.com/SITE-MAP.html

     http://www.nnhs65.00freehost.com/famous-sailors-introduction.html

          http://www.nnhs65.00freehost.com/famous-sailors.html

   DOUBLE OOPS!! The image and story were somehow missing from your note, so I thought that rather than bother you, I'd just snag them myself, but that was not to be, as it's a members-only site, and I'm not exactly eligible to join! 

http://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/ 

 
     I did find some references for Bro. Marriott, though, and even a picture of him in uniform - a Boy Scout uniform - which works for a good start (not surprisingly, he was an Eagle Scout):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._W._Marriott,_Jr.

http://www.blogs.marriott.com/ 

http://www.hotelchatter.com/tag/Omni%20Hotels/2

 
 
  
   As for geedunk, Paul's more than a bit under the weather right now (Honored Family Tradition: SOMEONE must "celebrate" each and every holiday and birthday by being anywhere from a little sick up to violently ill), so he didn't seem to recall the term or its application. I did find this definition online, but I must say I'm baffled at the context in the article's title, so I'll just have to annoy you for a resend after all.

From http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=geedunk:

1. An old U.S. Navy term. Candy, junk food, etc.

2. A place where it can be obtained.

"Jones would rather pig out on geedunk than eat real food." "I'm thinkin' of goin' down to the geedunk. I'll fly if you'll buy."

   Thanks, Major Madagan - for everything!


      From My Husband, Paul Harty (Bardolph HS, IL - '61) of IL - 11/10/09 - "For Veterans Day: You will enjoy this.":

Each year I am hired to go to Washington, DC, with the eighth grade class from Clinton, WI., where I grew up, to videotape their trip. I greatly enjoy visiting our nation’s capitol, and each year I take some special memories back with me. This fall’s trip was especially memorable.

On the last night of our trip this year, we stopped at the Iwo Jima memorial. This memorial is the largest bronze statue in the world and depicts one of the most famous photographs in history — that of the six brave soldiers raising the American Flag at the top of a rocky hill on the island of Iwo Jima, Japan, during WW II.

Over one hundred students and chaperones piled off the buses and headed towards the memorial. I noticed a solitary figure at the base of the statue, and as I got closer he asked, “Where are you guys from?”

I told him that we were from Wisconsin. “Hey, I'm a cheesehead, too! Come gather around, Cheeseheads, and I will tell you a story.”

James Bradley just happened to be in Washington, DC, to speak at the memorial the following day. He was there that night to say good night to his dad, who has since passed away. He was just about to leave when he saw the buses pull up. I videotaped him as he spoke to us, and received his permission to share what he said from my videotape. It is one thing to tour the incredible monuments filled with history in Washington, D.C., but it is quite another to get the kind of insight we received that night. When all had gathered around, he reverently began to speak.

(Here are his words that night.)

“My name is James Bradley and I’m from Antigo, Wisconsin. My dad is on that statue, and I just wrote a book called “Flags of Our Fathers” which is #5 on the New York Times Best Seller list right now. It is the story of the six boys you see behind me.

“Six boys raised the flag. The first guy putting the pole in the ground is Harlon Block. Harlon was an all-state football player. He enlisted in the Marine Corps with all the senior members of his football team. They were off to play another type of game. A game called “War.” But it didn’t turn out to be a game. Harlon, at the age of 21, died with his intestines in his hands. I don’t say that to gross you out, I say that because there are generals who stand in front of this statue and talk about the glory of war. You guys need to know that most of the boys in Iwo Jima were 17, 18, and 19 years old. He pointed to the statue.

“You see this next guy? That’s Rene Gagnon from New Hampshire. If you took Rene’s helmet off at the moment this photo was taken and looked in the webbing of that helmet, you would find a photograph ... a photograph of his girlfriend. Rene put that in there for protection because he was scared. He was 18 years old. Boys won the battle of Iwo Jima. Boys. Not old men.

“The next guy here, the third guy in this tableau, was Sergeant Mike Strank. Mike is my hero. He was the hero of all these guys. They called him the “old man” because he was so old. He was already 24. When Mike would motivate his boys in training camp, he didn’t say, ‘Let’s go kill some Japanese’ or ‘Let’s die for our country.’ He knew he was talking to young boys. Instead he would say, ‘You do what I say, and I’ll get you home to your mothers.’

“The last guy on this side of the statue is Ira Hayes, a Pima Indian from Arizona. Ira Hayes walked off Iwo Jima. He went into the White House with my dad. President Truman told him, ‘You’re a hero.’ He told reporters, ‘How can I feel like a hero when 250 of my buddies hit the island with me and only 27 of us walked off alive?’ So you take your class at school, 250 of you spending a year together having fun, doing everything together. Then all 250 of you hit the beach, but only 27 of your classmates walk off alive. That was Ira Hayes. He had images of horror in his mind. Ira Hayes died dead drunk, face down at the age of 32 ... ten years after this picture was taken.

“The next guy, going around the statue, is Franklin Sousley from Hilltop, Kentucky, a fun-lovin’ hillbilly boy. His best friend, who is now 70, told me, ‘Yeah, you know, we took two cows up on the porch of the Hilltop General Store. Then we strung wire across the stairs so the cows couldn’t get down. Then we fed them Epsom salts. Those cows crapped all night.’ Yes, he was a fun-lovin’ hillbilly boy. Franklin died on Iwo Jima at the age of 19. When the telegram came to tell his mother that he was dead, it went to the Hilltop General Store. A barefoot boy ran that telegram up to his mother’s farm. The neighbors could hear her scream all night and into the morning. The neighbors lived a quarter of a mile away.

“The next guy, as we continue to go around the statue, is my dad, John Bradley from Antigo, Wisconsin, where I was raised. My dad lived until 1994, but he would never give interviews. When Walter Cronkite’s producers or the New York Times would call, we were trained as little kids to say, ‘No, I’m sorry, sir, my dad’s not here. He is in Canada fishing. No, there is no phone there, sir. No, we don’t know when he is coming back.’ My dad never fished or even went to Canada. Usually, he was sitting there right at the table eating his Campbell’s soup. But we had to tell the press that he was out fishing. He didn’t want to talk to the press.

“You see, my dad didn’t see himself as a hero. Everyone thinks these guys are heroes because they are in a photo and on a monument. My dad knew better. He was a medic. John Bradley from Wisconsin was a caregiver. In Iwo Jima he probably held over 200 boys as they died. And when boys died in Iwo Jima, they writhed and screamed in pain.

“When I was a little boy, my third grade teacher told me that my dad was a hero. When I went home and told my dad that, he looked at me and said, ‘I want you always to remember that the heroes of Iwo Jima are the guys who did not come back. Did NOT come back.’

“So that’s the story about six nice young boys. Three died on Iwo Jima, and three came back as national heroes. Overall, 7,000 boys died on Iwo Jima in the worst battle in the history of the Marine Corps. My voice is giving out, so I will end here. Thank you for your time.”

Suddenly, the monument wasn’t just a big old piece of metal with a flag sticking out of the top. It came to life before our eyes with the heartfelt words of a son who did indeed have a father who was a hero. Maybe not a hero for the reasons most people would believe, but a hero nonetheless.

We need to remember that God created this vast and glorious world for us to live in, freely, but also at great sacrifice. Let us never forget from the Revolutionary War to the current War
on Terrorism and all the wars in-between that sacrifice was made for our freedom.

Remember to pray praises for this great country of ours and also pray for those still in murderous unrest around the world. STOP and thank God for being alive and being free at someone else's sacrifice.

G
od Bless You and God Bless America.

REMINDER: Everyday that you can wake up free, it's going to be a great day.

One thing I learned while on tour with my 8th grade students in DC that is not mentioned here is . . . that if you look at the statue very closely and count the number of 'hands' raising the flag, there are 13. When the man who made the statue was asked why there were 13, he simply said the 13th hand was the hand of God.

I thought this was a great story - worth your time - worth every American's time.

   Thank you, Paul - I think so, too!


        From My #2 Son, Brent Harty (Hillsboro HS, IL - '90) of TX - 11/10/09 - "Speechless":

Thought you would enjoy this article especially on Veterans Day. 

Love bh

As I came out of the supermarket that sunny day, pushing my cart of groceries towards my car, I saw an old man with the hood of his car up and a lady sitting inside the car, with the door open. The old man was looking at the engine. I put my groceries away in my car and continued to watch the old gentleman from about twenty five feet away.

I saw a young man in his early twenties with a grocery bag in his arm, walking towards the old man.. The old gentleman saw him coming too and took a few steps towards him. I saw the old gentleman point to his open hood and say something.

The young man put his grocery bag into what looked like a brand new Cadillac Escalade and then turn back to the old man and I heard him yell at the old gentleman saying, 'You shouldn't even be allowed to drive a car at your age.' And then with a wave of his hand, he got in his car and peeled rubber out of the parking lot.

I saw the old gentleman pull out his handkerchief and mop his brow as he went back to his car and again looked at the engine. He then went to his wife and spoke with her and appeared to tell her it would be okay. I had seen enough and I approached the old man. He saw me coming and stood straight and as I got near him I said, 'Looks like you're having a problem.'

He smiled sheepishly and quietly nodded his head. I looked under the hood myself and knew that whatever the problem was, it was beyond me. Looking around I saw a gas station up the road and told the old man that I would be right back.

I drove to the station and went inside and saw three attendants working on cars. I approached one of them and related the problem the old man had with his car and offered to pay them if they could follow me back down and help him.

The old man had pushed the heavy car under the shade of a tree and appeared to be comforting his wife. When he saw us he straightened up and thanked me for my help.

As the mechanics diagnosed the problem (overheated engine) I spoke with the old gentleman. When I shook hands with him earlier, he had noticed my Marine Corps ring and had commented about it, telling me that he had been a Marine too. I nodded and asked the usual question, 'What outfit did you serve with?'

He had mentioned that he served with the first Marine Division at Tarawa, Saipan, Iwo Jima and Guadalcanal . He had hit all the big ones and retired from the Corps after the war was over. As we talked we h eard the car engine come on and saw the mechanics lower the hood. They came over to us as the old man reached for his wallet, but was stopped by me and I told him I would just put the bill on my AAA card.

He still reached for the wallet and handed me a card that I assumed had his name and address on it and I stuck it in my pocket.. We all shook hands all around again and I said my goodbye's to his wife.

I then told the two mechanics that I would follow them back up to the station. Once at the station I told them that they had interrupted their own jobs to come along with me and help the old man. I said I wanted to pay for the help, but they refused to charge me.

One of them pulled out a card from his pocket looking exactly like the card the old man had given to me. Both of the men told me then, that they were Marine Corps Reserves. Once again we shook hands all around and as I was leaving, one of them told me I should look at the card the old man had given to me I said would and drove off.

For some reason I had gone about two blocks when I pulled over and took the card out of my pocket and looked at it for a long, long time. The name of the old gentleman was on the card in golden leaf and under his name.......... 'Congressional Medal of Honor Society.'

I sat there motionless looking at the card and reading it over and over. I looked up from the card and smiled to no one but myself and marveled that on this day, four Marines had all come together, because one of us needed help. He was an old man all right, but it felt good to have stood next to greatness and courage and an honor to have been in his presence. Remember, OLD men like him gave you FREEDOM for America. Thanks to those who served...& those who supported them.

America is not at war. The U.S. Military is at war. America is at the Mall. If you don't stand behind our troops, PLEASE feel free to stand in front of them!

Remember, Freedom isn't Free, thousands have paid the price so you can enjoy what you have today.

   This is a beautiful selection. Thanks so much, Brent - for everything!       


      From Buster Vest ('63) of VA - related from Col. Barton Campbell, USAR (Ret), of VA - 11/10/09 - "Veterans Day":

All-

This has been out for several years, but it is still a favorite.  It is a Canadian production,  but speaks for our veterans too. I hope you will take a few minutes to watch it. I think the following definition of a Veteran, pretty well sums it up: 

“A Veteran - whether active duty, retired, National Guard or Reserve - is someone who, at one point in his or her life, wrote a blank check, made payable to 'The United States of America', for an amount of 'up to and including my life.' ”  

A footnote: when in Europe some years back, we were able to participate,  I think in a train station if memory serves me correctly, as the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month was remembered with a moment of silence.

With thanks to all my fellow service members,

Barton
COL, FA, USAR (Ret)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYlrrAWCTRg - A Pittance of Time - Terry Kelly

   I had seen this moving video several years ago, but not lately. Thank you so much, Buster - and Col. Campbell - for everything!

http://www.va.roa.org/


      From My Niece, Shari, of VA - 11/10/09 - "Unusual Things In This World":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hkPGJuSjdc
I think a couple or so of the pics may be fake, but not all.
Love this song!

   WOWZERS! Some of these are WAY weird! Thanks, Shari!


ABBREVIATED ALERT:

  From Jane Chambers of VA - 07/01/09 - "CNC BOOK BROCHURE & AD":

http://www.nnhs65.00freehost.com/CNC-CNU/brochure(2).pdf

http://www.nnhs65.00freehost.com/CNC-CNU/CNC-Memories-Book-219390602.pdf

   Contact Dr. Chambers at cncmemories61_71@yahoo.com.

   Thanks, Jane!


FINALLY:

From ArcaMax Jokes - 11/10/09:

Energy

Engineering classes at the University of Maryland are tough, and struggling students sometimes go to extremes in order to pass. Grading exams one semester, I got to this question: "What is the relationship between kinetic and potential energy?"

One student, obviously stumped, decided to get clever and wrote, "As far as I know, they're just friends, but there could be something else going on there."

*************

Linguistics

A linguistics professor was lecturing to his class one day. "In English," he said, "a double negative forms a positive.

In some languages though, such as Russian, a double negative is still a negative."

"However," he pointed out, "there is no language wherein a double positive can form a negative."

A voice from the back of the room piped up, "Yeah. Right."


DATES TO REMEMBER:

1.  Wednesday, December 9, 2009 - The Class of 1957 will hold its Holiday Party at Angelo's on Route 17.  RSVP no later than December 6.  For details, contact Pat Beck Letzinger at Pabletz@aol.com - CLASS OF 1957

2. Tuesday, December 15, 2009 - The Class of 1958 will hold its annual Holiday Party at Al Fresco Italian Ristorante, 11710 Jefferson Avenue. For details, contact Joe Drewry at Jwdvt@aol.com - CLASS OF 1958

3. Friday and Saturday, August 6 and 7, 2010 - The NNHS Class of 1970 will hold its 40-Year Reunion. Saturday night will be at the Kiln Creek Golf & Country Club. For details, contact Carol Comer Cutler at ca23comerww@aol.com or visit the reunion website at NNHS1970Reunion.myevent.com - CLASS OF 1970

4. Friday , Saturday, and Sunday, August 6, 7, and  8, 2010 - The NNHS Class of 1960 will hold its 50-Year Reunion at the Marriott Newport News at City Center. For details, contact Karen Weinstein Witte at  kwitte@tampabay.rr.com - CLASS OF 1960


PRAYER ROLL:

http://www.nnhs65.00freehost.com/requests-prayers.html - updated 11/10/09

BLOG:

http://nnhs.wordpress.com/ - updated 08/04/09


  I had at least four more items I had planned to add today (not to mention all the images from 1964's Reunion I have yet to process), but I'm afraid I'm just about to join Paul in our Traditional Family Holiday Observance, so I'll save them for next time.....

  Y'all take good care of each other!  TYPHOONS FOREVER!  We'll Always Have Buckroe!

                          Love to all, Carol

==============================================

NNHS CLASS OF '65 WEB SITE: http://www.nnhs65.00freehost.com

PERSONAL WEB SITE: http://www.angelfire.com/weird2/cluckmeat

==============================================

Carol Buckley Harty
618-530-9092
     

    To donate, click on the Donate Button on the left,  or just mail it directly to my home (address available upon request). Thanks! nnhs65@gmail.com
 




The Thunderer

Composed by
John Philip Sousa, 1889
(06 Nov 1854 - 06 Mar 1932)


"The Thunderer" midi courtesy of http://www.dws.org/sousa/works.htm - 11/11/09

 Veterans Day Image courtesy of http://screenrant.com/world-war-ii-movies-veterans-day-vic-4202/ - 11/11/09

Animated Military Seals clip art courtesy of http://www.wtv-zone.com/bluefox/collection_2.html - 05/26/06

Golden, Red, and Blue Stars Divider Line clip art courtesy of http://www.hellasmultimedia.com/webimages/fourthofjuly-htm/july_lines_4.htm - 11/11/09

Animated Tiny Birthday Cake clip art courtesy of Sarah Puckett Kressaty ('65) of VA - 08/31/05
Thanks, Sarah Sugah!

Coast Guard Flag clip art courtesy of http://www.angelfire.com/ny4/KevsGifsGalore/Patriotic.html - 06/18/03

Marine Corps Seal clip art courtesy of the late Herbert Hice of MI - one of my Famous Marines who served in the South Pacific during WWII.
Thanks again, Herbie!

Army Seal clip art courtesy of Al Farber ('64) of GA - 05/24/06 (still missing...)
Thanks, Al!
Replaced by Norm Covert ('61) of MD - 02/09/09
Thanks, Norm!

Navy Seal clip art courtesy of http://www.onemileup.com/miniSeals.asp - 05/29/06

Embarrassed Smiley clip art courtesy of http://www.pdclipart.org/displayimage.php?album=108&pos=96 - 03/01/09

Hillsboro High School's Topper (Band Version) clip art courtesy of http://www.hillsboroschools.net/schools/hhs/activities/music2/Band/bio.html - 06/07/08
Thanks, Mark!

Coast Guard Seal clip art courtesy of http://www.tioh.hqda.pentagon.mil/SealsEmblems/USCG.htm - 10/03/07

Animated Ringing Gold Bell clip art (designed by Art Holden) courtesy of http://www.animationfactory.com - 12/08/05

Animated Sick Smiley courtesy of http://www.hauntedhamilton.com/cgi-bin/scripts/board-image-lister.cgi - 05/04/09

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