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10/22/11 - NNHS Newsletter - I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry

We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome.
One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say -- and to feel --
'Yes, that's the way it is, or at least that's the way I feel it. You're not as alone as you thought.''”

- John Steinbeck
(27 Feb 1902 - 20 Dec 1968)

Dear Friends and Schoolmates,

   It's hard to believe I've never used this sad old song from 1949 before; you know how much I love sad old songs.  

BONUS - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WkztDzpTHKA - I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry - Hank Williams, 1949


From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I%27m_So_Lonesome_I_Could_Cry

"I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry" is a song written and recorded by American country music singer-songwriter Hank Williams in 1949. The song about loneliness was largely inspired by his troubled relationship with wife Audrey Sheppard. With evocative lyrics, such as the opening lines "Hear that lonesome whip-poor-will/He sounds too blue to fly," the song has been covered by a wide range of musicians.

Rolling Stone ranked it #111 on their list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. It's the second oldest song on the list, and one of only two from the 1940s.


REMINDER:

    From Jennie Sheppard ('62) of NC - 10/15/11 - "Lecture":

Hi Carol:
 
I love receiving the newsletter. Thank you.

I will be giving a lecture on "Finding Your Civil War Ancestor" at the Martin Memorial Library here in Williamston, NC on the 27th of October at 7:00 p.m.  It is sponsored by the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. 

 
It is free and open to the public. If any of you are in the area, you are most welcome to attend.

Thanks, Jen

Jennifer Sheppard
Certificate in Family History Research
Professional Research Option
Brigham Young University

   SUPER-DE-DUPER! Thanks so much, Jen - wish I could be there!


THIS WEEK'S BIRTHDAYS:

   Happy Birthday today to       the late Herb Hice (deceased 18 Apr 2008)  AND   the late Sharron Wanderer Dawes ('61) (deceased 22 Sept 2007) AND   Annette Funicello of CA AND    Craig Miller ('63) of FL AND   Al Farber ('64) of GA!

   Happy Birthday tomorrow to   Jimmy Hines ('64) of Northern VA!

   Happy Birthday this week to:

24 -   Agnes Dick Kump ('57) AND   Mark Friedman ('65) of VA;

25 - Kitty Taylor Hanrahan ('57) AND  Carol Wornom Sorenson ('57) AND     Bobby Turpin ('58) of VA;

26 -    Terry Hunsucker ('65) of KY AND   Randy Tate ('66) of DE;

27 -   Carolyn Simpson Knight ('56) of VA AND Kermit Whiteside ('57) AND        Dimples Dinwiddie Prichard ('58) of NC AND   Frances Heath Scott ('62) of VA;

28 -   Nancy Bigger Alligood ('56) of VA;

29 -     Ray Barnes ('65) of VA AND   Christine Wilson Starkman ('68) of CA!

   Many Happy Returns, One and All!

http://www.nnhs65.com/Happy-Birthday.html


TODAY IN THE WAR BETWEEN THE STATES:

From http://www.civilwarinteractive.com/This%20Day/thisday1022.htm - INCLUDING:

Tuesday, Oct. 22, 1861
BALL’S BLUFF BOONDOGGLE BROADCAST


The survivors of the Army of the Potomac were still straggling back across the river (those who hadn’t drowned, been captured or run away, that is) as the word of the Union defeat began to hit the newspapers of Washington and Richmond. As the news spread across the telegraph wires of the country, the magnitude of the losses had a very disturbing effect on the North. The loss at Bull Run earlier in the summer had been bad enough, but now this second foray into Virginia meeting a similar repulse made it clear that the War would be much longer than expected. The death of Colonel (and former Oregon Senator) Edward D. Baker was also the cause of much wailing, despite the fact that it was his own poor planning that led in large part to his own demise, along with many others of his command.

Wednesday, Oct. 22, 1862
WATERY WABASH WEAPONRY WIELDED


In theory, there was land-based cannon and ship-mounted cannon, and never the twain were supposed to mix. For one thing, land-based weaponry was mounted on carriages (or, rarely, railroad cars) to get it from place to place, while ships’ guns were supposed to be bolted firmly to the deck to keep them from going from place to place and squashing their operators. Necessity, that mother of invention, gave birth to some occasional exceptions however, and one such case occurred today. Three 12-pound guns (the poundage refers to the weight of the projectile fired and not the weight of the weapon itself) were dismounted from their usual places on the deck of the USS Wabash and transferred into small boats. These were used in support of the Union assault on Pocogaligo, South Carolina. The assault was a miserable failure.

Thursday, Oct. 22, 1863
GIMPY GENERAL GRANT GETS GRIMY


Yesterday Gen. Ulysses S. “Sam” Grant had paused for a day in Stevenson, Georgia, in order to confer with Gen. William Starke Rosecrans, late commander of the Army of the Cumberland. Rosecrans, after a very successful campaign across the state of Tennessee, had come to grief in the battle of Chickamauga when Bragg’s Army of Tennessee had stopped him, defeated him, and nearly cut him off entirely. Since then his army had been bottled up in the deserted streets of Chattanooga. Today, conference ended, Grant continued on his journey to join the army there. The roads, due to fall rains, were deep in mud and travel was miserable at best. It was worse for Grant, who was still suffering the effects of leg injuries sustained when his horse fell on him some weeks ago. Afoot he had to use crutches.

Saturday, Oct. 22, 1864
PRICE PREPARES PREEMPTIVE POUNCE

Gen. Sterling Price had set forth intending to take Missouri out of the Union. At the moment, however, he would have been more than happy to take himself out of Missouri, and his Confederate and Missouri State Guard force with him. This ambition was being hindered by having Union forces on three sides of him, and the Missouri River on the fourth. Therefore he was in the planning stages of a breakout attempt. His orders were for the supply train to head south along the river, and then have Jo Shelby and James F. Fagan attack the Union Army of the Border, while John S. Marmaduke protected the rear from Pleasanton’s cavalry brigade. Surrounded and heavily outnumbered, the plan was desperate in the extreme, but Price had no choice but attack or surrender.


  From Joyce Lawrence Cahoon ('65) of VA - 10/21/11 - "Beautiful":

  Truth!

STONE

TWO FRIENDS WERE WALKING THROUGH THE DESERT.
DURING SOME POINT OF THE JOURNEY, THEY HAD AN
ARGUMENT; AND ONE FRIEND SLAPPED THE OTHER ONE IN THE FACE.


THE ONE WHO GOT SLAPPED WAS HURT, BUT WITHOUT
SAYING ANYTHING, WROTE IN THE SAND,


TODAY MY BEST FRIEND SLAPPED ME IN THE FACE.


THEY KEPT ON WALKING, UNTIL THEY FOUND AN OASIS,
WHERE THEY DECIDED TO TAKE A BATH .


THE ONE WHO HAD BEEN SLAPPED GOT STUCK IN THE
MIRE AND STARTED DROWNING, BUT THE FRIEND SAVED HIM.


AFTER HE RECOVERED FROM THE NEAR DROWNING,
HE WROTE ON A STONE:


'TODAY MY BEST FRIEND SAVED MY LIFE'


THE FRIEND WHO HAD SLAPPED AND SAVED HIS BEST FRIEND ASKED HIM,
'AFTER I HURT YOU, YOU WROTE IN THE SAND AND NOW, YOU WRITE ON A STONE, WHY?'


THE FRIEND REPLIED, 'WHEN SOMEONE HURTS US
WE SHOULD WRITE IT DOWN IN SAND, WHERE
WINDS OF FORGIVENESS CAN ERASE IT AWAY.


'BUT, WHEN SOMEONE DOES SOMETHING GOOD FOR US,
WE MUST ENGRAVE IT IN STONE WHERE NO WIND CAN EVER ERASE IT.'


LEARN TO WRITE YOUR HURTS IN THE SAND AND TO CARVE YOUR BENEFITS IN STONE.


THEY SAY IT TAKES A MINUTE TO FIND A SPECIAL PERSON,

AN HOUR TO APPRECIATE THEM,

A DAY TO LOVE THEM,

BUT THEN, AN ENTIRE LIFE TO FORGET THEM.


SEND THIS TO THE PEOPLE YOU'LL NEVER FORGET.


I JUST DID..


IF YOU DON'T SEND IT TO ANYONE, IT MEANS YOU'RE IN A HURRY AND THAT YOU'VE FORGOTTEN YOUR FRIENDS.


TAKE THE TIME TO LIVE!


DO NOT VALUE THE THINGS YOU HAVE IN YOUR LIFE, BUT VALUE WHO YOU HAVE KNOWN IN YOUR LIFE!


AND IF I HAPPEN TO GET IT BACK, THEN I KNOW MY PLACE IN YOUR LIFE.


Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle.
 

   Thanks so much, Joyce!


   From Judy Phillips Allen ('66) of VA - 10/21/11 - "Penny Postcards, one of the best...":

Hi, Carol!  I don't remember seeing this before on the NNHS site.  Thought you might like it.
 
Judy

Be sure to also click on "Types of Postcards" --- interesting.
 
Penny Postcards, one of the best.
 
This is very interesting....!!!!

What did your hometown area look like according to Penny Postcards?

Check out your old stomping grounds during those times.

Click on the State and then on the County name to see old penny picture postcards from that area ... pretty neat.

http://www.usgwarchives.org/special/ppcs/ppcs.html

   Actually, we have run this a couple of times before, but it's been quite a while, and as you say, it is very interesting - and I DO really like it! Thanks, Dearest Judy!


  From Bill Hobbs ('66) of Northern VA - 10/21/11 - "1911 Ford Model T":

THE YEAR IS 1911
 
This will boggle your mind, I know it did mine!
 
 

************ ********* ***********
The year is 1911  --- One hundred years ago.
What a difference a century makes!
Here are some statistics for the Year 1911:
************ ********* ************
The average life expectancy for men was 47 years.

Fuel for this car was sold in drug stores only.
 
Only 14 percent of the homes had a bathtub.
 
Only 8 percent of the homes had a telephone.

1911 Ford Model T
 

There were only 8,000 cars and only 144 miles of paved roads.

The maximum speed limit in most cities was 10 mph.

The tallest structure in the world was the Eiffel Tower!

The average US wage in 1910 was 22 cents per hour.

The average US worker made between $200 and $400 per year.

A competent accountant could expect to earn $2000 per year, a dentist $2,500 per year, a veterinarian between $1,500 and $4,000 per year, and a mechanical engineer about $5,000 per year.

More than 95 percent of all births took place at home.

Ninety percent of all doctors had NO COLLEGE EDUCATION! Instead, they attended so-called medical schools, many of which were condemned in the press AND the government as "substandard."

Sugar cost four cents a pound, eggs were fourteen cents a dozen, and coffee was fifteen cents a pound.

Most women only washed their hair once a month, and used Borax or egg yolks for shampoo.

Canada passed a law that prohibited poor people from entering into their country for any reason.

The five leading causes of death were:

1. Pneumonia and influenza
2. Tuberculosis
3. Diarrhea
4. Heart disease
5. Stroke

The American flag had 45 stars....

The population of Las Vegas, Nevada, was only 30!!!

Crossword puzzles, canned beer, and iced tea hadn't been invented yet.

There was neither a Mother's Day nor a Father's Day.

Two out of every 10 adults couldn't read or write and only 6 percent of all Americans had graduated from high school.

Marijuana, heroin, and morphine were all available over the counter at the local corner drugstores.

Back then pharmacists said, "Heroin clears the complexion, gives buoyancy to the mind, regulates the stomach and bowels,
and is, in fact, a perfect guardian of health!"

( Shocking? )

Eighteen percent of households had at least one full-time servant or domestic help .........

There were about 230 reported murders in the ENTIRE U.S.A.!

I am now going to forward this to someone else without typing it myself.

From there, it will be sent to others all over the WORLD - all in a matter of seconds!

Try to imagine what it may be like in another 100 years.
 

   YOWZERONI-WOWZERONI! Thank you so much, Bill!


  From Judy Phillips Allen ('66) of VA - 10/21/11 - "English Lesson":

English lesson:

No English dictionary has been able to adequately explain the difference between the two words COMPLETE and FINISHED, in a way that is easy to understand. Some people say there is no difference between COMPLETE and FINISHED. However, there is a difference. When you marry the right woman, you are COMPLETE. And when you marry the wrong woman, you are FINISHED. And when the right one catches you with the wrong one, you are --- COMPLETELY FINISHED!

My work is done...

     Thanks again, Dearest Judy!


    From Stacy Dorn Davis ('64) of VA - 10/21/11 - "retire":

Those who smile when things go wrong have someone in mind to blame.

Plan ahead!

RETIREMENT OPTION

You can retire to Phoenix, IF...
1. You are willing to park three blocks away because you found shade.
2. You've experienced condensation on your butt from the hot water in the toilet bowl.
3. You can drive for 4 hours in one direction and never leave town.
4. You have over 100 recipes for Mexican food.
5. You know that "dry heat" is comparable to what hits you in the face when you open your oven door.
6. You realize that 4 seasons are: tolerable, hot, really hot, and ARE YOU KIDDING ME??!!

OR, you can retire to California where...
1. You can make over $300,000 per year and you still can't afford to buy a house.
2. The fastest part of your commute is going down your driveway.
3. You know how to eat an artichoke.
4. You drive your rented Mercedes to your neighborhood block party.
5. When someone asks you how far something is, you tell them how long it will take to get there rather than how many miles away it is.
6. The 4 seasons are: fire, flood, mud, and drought.

OR, you can retire to New York City where...
1. You say "the city" and expect everyone to know you mean Manhattan.
2. You can get into a 4-hour argument about how to get from Columbus Circle to Battery Park, but can't find Wisconsin on a map.
3. You think Central Park is "nature."
4. You believe that being able to swear at people in their own language makes you multi-lingual.
5. You've worn out a car horn (if you have a car).

OR, you can retire to Montana where...
1. You only have four spices: salt, pepper, ketchup, and Tabasco.
2. Halloween costumes fit over parkas.
3. You have more than one recipe for moose.
4. Sexy lingerie is anything flannel with less than eight buttons.
5. The four seasons are: winter, still winter, almost winter, and construction.

OR, you can retire to the deep South where...
1. You can rent a movie and buy bait in the same store.
2. "Y'all" is singular and "all y'all" is plural...
3. "He needed killin'" is a valid defense.
4. Everyone has 2 first names: Billy Bob, Jimmy Bob, Mary Sue, Betty Jean, Mary Beth, etc.
5. Everything is either "in yonder," "over yonder" or "out yonder." It's important to know the difference, too.

OR, you can retire to Colorado where...
1. You carry your $3,000 mountain bike atop your $500 car.
2. You tell your husband to pick up Granola on his way home and so he stops at the day care center.
3. A pass does not involve a football or dating.
4. The top of your head is bald, but you still have a pony tail.

OR, you can retire to the Midwest where...
1. You've never met any celebrities, but the mayor knows your name.
2. Your idea of a traffic jam is 10 cars waiting to pass a tractor.
3. You have had to switch from "heat" to "A/C" on the same day.
4. You end sentences with a preposition, like: "Where's my coat at?"
5. When asked how your trip was to any exotic place, you say, "It was different!"

OR, you can retire to Florida where...
1. You eat dinner at 3:30 in the afternoon.
2. All purchases include a coupon of some kind -- even houses and cars.
3. Everyone can recommend an excellent dermatologist.
4. Road construction never ends anywhere in the State.
5. Cars in front of you often appear to be driven by headless people who tear along at 25 mph.

..............Or you can keep working until you pass on.

     Thanks, Stacy!


  From Bill Hobbs ('66) of Northern VA - 10/19/11 - "Granny's Pie [and other profound observations] (#2 in a series of 8)":

 

    A Hug is like a perfect gift.
One size fits all and nobody minds if you exchange it.

May your troubles be less,
Your blessings be more,
And nothing but happiness
Come through your door.

  Thanks, Bill!

 
 


  From Michael Sisk ('63) of CA - 10/07/11 - "Ghoulishly grand carved pumpkins - these are totally amazing!!! (#10 in a series of 18)":

  Getting close to Halloween...

Artist Ray Villafane began carving pumpkins on a lark for his art students in a small rural school district in Michigan. The hobby changed his life as he gained a viral following online and unlocked his genuine love of sculpting. Here are images of pumpkin carvings Villafane created over the past five years.
    

   Thanks, Michael! These are incredible! Mostly gross, but incredible, nonetheless! 

 It's alive!!
 


FINALLY:

From www.aJokeADay.com - 10/21/11:

Q: What did one math book say to the other?

A: Man I got a lot of problems! 


DATES TO REMEMBER:

1. Thursday, November 3, 2011 - The NNHS Class of 1955 holds Lunch Bunch gatherings on the first Thursday of every month at Steve & John's Steak House on Jefferson Avenue just above Denbigh Boulevard in Newport News at 11:00 AM. The luncheon is not limited to just the Class of '55; if you have friends in that year, go visit with them.

2. Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - The NNHS Class of June 1942 meets at noon on the second Wednesday of every other month for a Dutch treat lunch at the James River Country Club, 1500 Country Club Road. PLEASE JOIN THEM. Give or take a few years makes no difference. Good conversation, food and atmosphere. For details, call Jennings Bryan at 803-7701 for reservations.

3. Saturday, January 7, 2012 - 11:00 AM - The NNHS Breakfast Bunch will host a Breakfast Bunch Brunch at the Warwick Restaurant, 12306 Warwick Boulevard, (across from CNU) Newport News, Virginia 23606. "Please come join them for a Dutch Treat Brunch featuring a lot of 'War Stories' and maybe a lie or two. Everyone is welcome so bring your wife, husband, boy friend, girl friend, class mate, school friend or whomever you choose." Please RSVP to Bill Roady at duckbill1@verizon.net or call him at 757-595-0716 so they have a head count.


PRAYER ROLL:

http://www.nnhs65.com/requests-prayers.html - updated 10/21/11

BLOG:

http://nnhs.wordpress.com/ - updated 03/13/11



  
Y'all take care of each other!  TYPHOONS FOREVER!  We'll Always Have Buckroe!

                                 Love to all, Carol

==============================================

NNHS CLASS OF '65 WEB SITE: http://www.nnhs65.com

PERSONAL WEB SITE: http://www.angelfire.com/weird2/cluckmeat

==============================================



Carol Buckley Harty
7020 Lure Court
Fayetteville, NC 28311-9309
915-780-3048
 


THREE WAYS TO DONATE:  

1. Visit the main page (http://www.nnhs65.com), scroll halfway down, and click on the Pay Pal Donate Button (nnhs65@gmail.com);

2. Go to www.PayPal.com, log in, select "Send Money (Services) to nnhs65@gmail.com; or

3. Just mail it directly to my home. Thanks!    
             


I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry

Written and recorded by
Hank Williams (17 Sept 1923 – 01 Jan 1953), 1949  


Hear that lonesome whippoorwill,
He sounds too blue to fly.
The midnight train is whining low,
I'm so lonesome I could cry.

I've never seen a night so long
When time goes crawling by.
The moon just went behind a cloud
To hide its face and cry.

Did you ever see a robin weep,
When leaves began to die?
That means he's lost the will to live,
I'm so lonesome I could cry.

The silence of a falling star
Lights up a purple sky.
And as I wonder where you are
I'm so lonesome I could cry.


"I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry" midi courtesy of http://www.barefootsworld.net/midijamboree.html - 10/28/11 (sic)

"I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry" lyrics courtesy
of http://www.cowboylyrics.com/lyrics/williams-hank-jr/im-so-lonesome-i-could-cry-976.html - 10/28/11 (sic)

Falling Star Image courtesy of http://www.thewallpapers.org/tag/falling - 10/28/11 (sic)

Divider Line clip art courtesy of - well, I don't know, but it's been in my files since 09/05/05

Animated Tiny Birthday Cake clip art courtesy of Sarah Puckett Kressaty ('65) of VA - 08/31/05
Thanks, Sarah Sugah!

Animated USMC Flag clip art courtesy of http://www.angelfire.com/ny4/KevsGifsGalore/Patriotic.html - 06/18/03

Image of Annette Funicello courtesy of http://www.allposters.com/-sp/Annette-Funicello-Posters_i305663_.htm - 10/21/06

Army Seal clip art also courtesy of Al Farber ('64) of GA - 05/24/06
Thanks again, Al!

Air Force Seal clip art courtesy of http://www1.va.gov/opa/feature/celebrate/milsongs.htm - 07/07/06

Navy Seal clip art courtesy of http://www.onemileup.com/miniSeals.asp - 05/29/06

Animated Laughing Woman courtesy of Joyce Lawrence Cahoon ('65) of VA - 02/23/09
Thanks, Joyce!

Animated Dancing Teddy courtesy of Sandi Bateman Chestnut ('65) of VA - 03/08/11
Thanks, Sandi!

Animated Laughing Jerry courtesy of Cookie Phillips Tyndall ('64) of VA - 06/14/06
Thanks, Cookie!

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