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09/26/16 - NNHS Newsletter - Hello Stranger

“Love is a strange master, and human nature is still stranger.”

- Edgar Rice Burroughs
(01 Sep 1875 - 19 Mar 1950)

Dear Friends and Schoolmates,   

   We don't seem to use this Newsletter theme song very often. Perhaps the time has come again.

BONUS - - Hello Stranger - Barbara Lewis


"Hello Stranger" was a 1963 hit single by Barbara Lewis which spent two weeks at number one on the R&B singles chart in Billboard crossing over to #3 Pop.[1]

"Hello Stranger" was written by Barbara Lewis herself who was originally inspired to write a song with that title while working gigs in Detroit with her musician father: “I would make the circuit with my dad and people would yell out: ‘Hey stranger, hello stranger, it’s been a long time’". The song is notable because its title comprises the first two words of the lyrics but is never at any point repeated throughout the rest of the song.

Lewis recorded "Hello Stranger" at Chess Studios in Chicago in January 1963. The track's producer Ollie McLaughlin recruited the Dells to provide the background vocals. The arrangement by Riley Hampton - then working with Etta James - featured a signature organ riff provided by keyboardist John Young. The track was completed after thirteen takes. Lewis would recall that on hearing the playback of the finished track, Dells member Chuck Barksdale "kept jumping up and down and saying, ‘It’s a hit, it’s a hit.’...I didn’t really know. It was all new to me...” [1]


  Happy Birthday today to  The late Tommy Scott ('61) (deceased 01/05/10)!

  Happy Birthday tomorrow to Judy McCall Nesbitt ('65) of NC;!

  Happy Birthday this week to:  

28 -  Richard Dawes (NNHS / HHS - '62) of VA AND     My Granddaughter, Kaiya Harty of IL;

29 - Bill Shaw ('63) of VA AND the late Bill Weaver ('63) (deceased 05/20/16);

01 -  MaeLea Somervold Cifers ('62) of VA AND   Jerry Baker Cobb ('66) of VA;

02 - Barry Hatchett ('63) of VA AND  Stuart Nachman ('63) of VA AND    Wayne Frizzelle ('65) of MD AND  Paige Spencer;

003 - Martha Megann Keesee ('57) AND Mary Megann Peters ('57) AND   Larry Moran ('65) of ID AND    Bridget Whitt Jones ('65) of AR!

   Many Happy Returns, One and All!


September 26, 1942 - The Holocaust: August Frank, a higher official of the SS concentration camp administration department, issued a memorandum containing a great deal of operational detail in how Jews should be "evacuated".

September 26, 1942 - Operation Market Garden failed when thousands of British and Polish troops were killed in an attempt to seize bridges in the Dutch town of Arnhem.

September 26, 1944 - On the central front of the Gothic Line, Brazilian troops gain control the Serchio Valley region after 10 days of fighting.


Monday, September 26, 1966 - Drummer Dean Butterworth was born in Rochdale, Greater Manchester, England.

Monday, September 26, 1966 - Singer-songwriter and producer Christos Dantis (Χρήστος Δάντης) was born in Athens, Greece.

Monday, September 26, 1966 - Jockey Shane Dye was born Raymond Shane Dye in the township of Matamata, New Zealand.

Monday, September 26, 1966 - Football player Craig Heyward was born Craig William Heyward in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania. He died of malignant bone cancer on 27 May 2006 at the age of 39.

Monday, September 26, 1966 - Actress and sportscaster Jillian Reynolds was born Jillian Marie Warry in Burlington, Ontario, Canada.

“No matter how difficult something you or a loved one faces, it should not take over your life and be the center of all your interest. Challenges are growth experiences, temporary scenes to be played out on the background of a pleasant life. Don’t become so absorbed in a single event that you can’t think of anything else or care for yourself or for those who depend upon you. Remember, much like the mending of the body, the healing of some spiritual and emotional challenges takes time.”

- Richard G. Scott
(07 Nov 1928 -
22 Sept 2015)

  From Carlene Matthews Vannoy ('60 / '64) of VA - 09/25/16:

  Thanks, Carlene!

From Inside SUCCESS - 09/25/16 - "20 Misused Words That Make Smart People Look Dumb":

20 Misused Words That Make Smart People Look Dumb

Which of these commonly confused words throw you off?
Travis Bradberry May 31, 2016

In this article, originally published on LinkedIn Pulse, Dr. Travis Bradberry shares 20 misused words that have a tendency to make even really smart people stumble. Learn them before they tempt you into looking bad.

We’re all tempted to use words we’re not too familiar with.

If this were the only problem, I wouldn’t have much to write about. That’s because we’re cautious with words we’re unsure of and, thus, they don’t create much of an issue for us.

It’s the words that we think we’re using correctly that wreak the most havoc.

We throw them around in meetings, emails and important documents (such as résumés and client reports), and they land like fingernails across a chalkboard on everyone who has to hear or read them.

We’re all guilty of this from time to time, myself included.

When I write, I hire an editor who is an expert in grammar to review my articles before I post them online. It’s bad enough to have a roomful of people witness your blunder and something else entirely to stumble in front of 100,000!

Point is, we can all benefit from opportunities to sharpen the saw and minimize our mistakes.

Often, it’s the words we perceive as being more “correct” or sophisticated that don’t really mean what we think they do. There are 20 such words that have the tendency to make even really smart people stumble.

Have a look to see which of these commonly confused words throw you off:

1. Accept vs. Except
These two words sound similar but have very different meanings. Accept means to receive something willingly: “His mom accepted his explanation” or “She accepted the gift graciously.” Except signifies exclusion: “I can attend every meeting except the one next week.”

To help you remember, note that both except and exclusion begin with ex.

2. Affect vs. Effect
To make these words even more confusing than they already are, both can be used as either a noun or a verb.

Let’s start with the verbs. Affect means to influence something or someone; effect means to accomplish something. “Your job was affected by the organizational restructuring” but “These changes will be effected on Monday.”

As a noun, an effect is the result of something: “The sunny weather had a huge effect on sales.” It’s almost always the right choice because the noun affect refers to an emotional state and is rarely used outside of psychological circles: “The patient’s affect was flat.”

3. Lay vs. Lie
We’re all pretty clear on the lie that means an untruth. It’s the other usage that trips us up. Lie also means to recline: “Why don’t you lie down and rest?” Lay requires an object: “Lay the book on the table.” Lie is something you can do by yourself, but you need an object to lay.

It’s more confusing in the past tense. The past tense of lie is—you guessed it—lay: “I lay down for an hour last night.” And the past tense of lay is laid: “I laid the book on the table.”

4. Bring vs. Take
Bring and take both describe transporting something or someone from one place to another, but the correct usage depends on the speaker’s point of view. Somebody brings something to you, but you take it to somewhere else: “Bring me the mail, then take your shoes to your room.”

Just remember, if the movement is toward you, use bring; if the movement is away from you, use take.1

5. Ironic vs. Coincidental
A lot of people get this wrong. If you break your leg the day before a ski trip, that’s not ironic—it’s coincidental (and bad luck).

Ironic has several meanings, all of which include some type of reversal of what was expected. Verbal irony is when a person says one thing but clearly means another. Situational irony is when a result is the opposite of what was expected. O. Henry was a master of situational irony. In “The Gift of the Magi,” Jim sells his watch to buy combs for his wife’s hair, and she sells her hair to buy a chain for Jim’s watch. Each character sold something precious to buy a gift for the other, but those gifts were intended for what the other person sold. That is true irony.

If you break your leg the day before a ski trip, that’s coincidental. If you drive up to the mountains to ski, and there was more snow back at your house, that’s ironic.

6. Imply vs. Infer
To imply means to suggest something without saying it outright. To infer means to draw a conclusion from what someone else implies. As a general rule, the speaker/writer implies, and the listener/reader infers.

7. Nauseous vs. Nauseated
Nauseous has been misused so often that the incorrect usage is accepted in some circles. Still, it’s important to note the difference. Nauseous means causing nausea; nauseated means experiencing nausea.

So, if your circle includes ultra-particular grammar sticklers, never say “I’m nauseous” unless you want them to be snickering behind your back.

8. Comprise vs. Compose
These are two of the most commonly misused words in the English language. Comprise means to include; compose means to make up.

It all comes down to parts versus the whole. When you use comprise, you put the whole first: “A soccer game comprises (includes) two halves.” When you use compose, you put the pieces first: “Fifty states compose (make up) the United States of America.”

9. Farther vs. Further
Farther refers to physical distance, while further describes the degree or extent of an action or situation. “I can’t run any farther,” but “I have nothing further to say.”

If you can substitute “more” or “additional,” use further.

10. Fewer vs. Less
Use fewer when you’re referring to separate items that can be counted; use less when referring to a whole: “You have fewer dollars, but less money.”

English grammar can be tricky, and a lot of times the words that sound right are actually wrong.

With words such as those listed above, you just have to memorize the rules so that when you are about to use them, you’ll catch yourself in the act and know for certain that you’ve said or written the correct one.

“I love love, I hate hate, and I’m indifferent about indifference.

Jarod Kintz 05 Mar 1982)

- Michelle Maks' Turkey Talk Throw - "This crocheted throw is perfect for napping after having Thanksgiving dinner! You’ll love having this throw as part of your fall decorating style."

BONUS RECIPES (Sorry; not theme-related): - Cheesy Bacon Ranch Potato Soup - "Traditional rich and creamy potato soup just got a makeover with this awesome recipe for Cheesy Bacon Ranch Potato Soup. This satisfying soup recipe has everything you love about "loaded" baked potatoes, but in the form of a warm and comforting soup. When the weather gets cool, there's nothing quite like curling up with a big bowl of hearty potato soup, so be sure to save this dish to your list of easy soup recipes. You're going to love it!" - Country Cider Pot Roast - "When my family thinks of Fall we think of apple picking, the leaves changing, sweaters and Mom's Country Cider Pot Roast. Simmered in apple cider this sweet roast is a seasonal must. This is not your average beef roast recipe and is worth a try." - Lazy Man's Pot Roast - "For a hearty meal that doesn't require a ton of time in the kitchen, turn to this easy recipe for Lazy Man's Pot Roast. With the help of your slow cooker, you can make a flavorful meal for the whole family and you'll barely have to lift a finger. Like all of our favorite easy slow cooker recipes, this pot roast recipe allows you to go about your day while your dinner basically cooks itself. How convenient!"




From - 09/25/16:

John and Tony were in a bar, pondering over Tony’s problems.

“Andrea and I want to get married,” said Tony, “but we can’t find anywhere to live.”

“Why don’t you live with Andrea’s parents for a while?” suggested John.

“We can’t do that,” said Tony, “they’re living with their parents for a while, too.”




1. Wednesday and Thursday, October 19 and 20, 2016 - The NNHS Class of 1956 will hold their 60-Year Reunion.

2. Wednesday, November 09, 2016 - The NNHS Class of June 1942 meets at noon on the second Wednesday of every other month for a Dutch treat lunch at the James River Country Club, 1500 Country Club Road. PLEASE JOIN THEM. Give or take a few years makes no difference. Good conversation, food and atmosphere. For details, call Jennings Bryan at 803-7701 for reservations.



PRAYER ROLL: - updated 09/02/16

BLOG: - updated 03/13/11



Y'all take care of each other!  TYPHOONS FOREVER!  We'll Always Have Buckroe!

                                 Love to all, Carol





Carol Buckley Harty
7020 Lure Court
Fayetteville, NC 28311-9309

"Never underestimate
the power of a drop
in the bucket."


1. Visit the main page (, scroll halfway down, and click on the Pay Pal Donate Button (;

2. Go to, log in, select "Send Money (Services) to; or

3. Just mail it directly to my home. Thanks! 

 Hello Stranger

Written and recorded by
Barbara Lewis (b. 09 Feb 1943), 1963

(shoo-bop, shoo-bop, my baby)
(shoo-bop, shoo-bop)

Hello, stranger
(ooh) It seems so good to see you back again
How long has it been?
(ooh, seems like a mighty long time)
(shoo-bop, shoo-bop, my baby, ooh)
It seems like a mighty long time

Oh-uh-oh, I my, my, my, my
I'm so glad
You stopped by to say "hello" to me
Remember that's the way it used to be
Ooh, it seems like a mighty long time
(shoo-bop, shoo-bop, my baby, ooh)
It seems like a mighty long time

Lewis sings a series of "oh-uh-oh's"on both sides of "I'm so glad you're here
again" while backups do 7 (shoo-bop, shoo-bop, my baby)'s

If you're not gonna stay
(ooh) Please don't treat me like you did before
Because I still love you so a-a-although
It seems like a mighty long time
Shoo-bop, shoo-bop, my baby, ooh
It seems like a mighty long time

Lewis does " Oh-uh-oh, I my, my, my, my" and "I'm so happy that you're here
again" and backups repeat (shoo-bop, shoo-bop, my baby) to end

 "Hello Stranger" midi courtesy of
at the suggestion of Dave Sprigs ('64) of VA - 09/05/03
Thanks, Dave!

 "Hello Stranger" lyrics courtesy of
also at the suggestion of Dave Sprigs ('64) of VA - 09/05/03
Thanks again, Dave!

Glitter Butterfly "Hello" title clip art courtesy of - 09/26/11

Butterflies Divider Line clip art courtesy of - 02/04/04

Animated Tiny Birthday Cake clip art courtesy of Sarah Puckett Kressaty ('65) of VA - 08/31/05
Thanks, Sarah Sugah!

John Marshall High School's Justice Scale clip art courtesy of Cheryl White Wilson (JMHS - '64) of VA - 10/13/05 (replaced 02/23/09)
Thanks, Cheryl!

Animated Army Flag clip art courtesy of - 06/18/03 

Animated Laughing Kitty courtesy of Al Farber ('64) of GA - 10/08/07
Thanks, Al!
Jeffrey Holman's Image "A Drop in the Bucket" courtesy of - 05/23/16

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