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08/31/21- NNHS Newsletter -
The Sound of Silence

“We sit silently and watch the world around us. This has taken a lifetime to learn. It seems only the old are able to sit
next to one another and not say anything and still feel content. The young, brash and impatient, must always break the silence.
It is a waste, for silence is pure. Silence is holy. It draws people together because only those who are comfortable with each other can sit
without speaking. This is the great paradox
.”

- Nicholas Sparks, The Notebook, 1996
(b. 31 Dec 1965)

Dear Friends and Schoolmates,

    Today's Newsletter theme is a Golden Oldie enjoying powerful new interpretations in recent years.

BONUS #1 - The Sound of Silence - Simon and Garfunkel, 1964

BONUS #2 - The Sound of Silence - Pentatonix, 2019

BONUS #3 - The Sound of Silence - Disturbed, 2015


From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sound_of_Silence

"The Sound of Silence", originally "The Sounds of Silence", is a song by the American music duo Simon & Garfunkel. The song was written by Paul Simon over several months in 1963 and 1964. A studio audition led to the duo signing a record deal with Columbia Records, and the original acoustic version of the song was recorded in March 1964 at Columbia Studios in New York City and included on their debut album, Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M.. Released on October 19, 1964,[2] the album was a commercial failure and led to the duo disbanding; Simon returned to England, and Art Garfunkel to his studies at Columbia University.

In 1965, the song began to attract airplay at radio stations in Boston, Massachusetts, and throughout Florida. The growing airplay led Tom Wilson, the song's producer, to remix the track, overdubbing electric instruments and drums. This remixed version was released as a single in September 1965. Simon & Garfunkel were not informed of the song's remix until after its release. The song hit No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for the week ending January 1, 1966, leading the duo to reunite and hastily record their second album, which Columbia titled Sounds of Silence in an attempt to capitalize on the song's success. The remixed single version of the song was included on this follow-up album.

It was featured in the 1967 film The Graduate and was included on the film's soundtrack album. It was additionally released on the Mrs. Robinson EP in 1968, along with three other songs from the film: "Mrs. Robinson", "April Come She Will" and "Scarborough Fair/Canticle". The song was a top-ten hit in multiple countries worldwide, among them Australia, Austria, West Germany, Japan and the Netherlands. Generally considered a classic folk rock song, the song was added to the National Recording Registry in the Library of Congress for being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically important" in 2012, along with the rest of the Sounds of Silence album. Originally titled "The Sounds of Silence" on the album Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M., the song was shortened for later compilations, beginning with the 1972 compilation album Simon and Garfunkel's Greatest Hits.[3]

Simon and Garfunkel had become interested in folk music and the growing counterculture movement separately in the early 1960s. Having performed together previously under the name Tom and Jerry in the late 1950s, their partnership had since dissolved when they began attending college. In 1963, they regrouped and began performing Simon's original compositions locally in Queens. They billed themselves "Kane & Garr", after old recording pseudonyms, and signed up for Gerde's Folk City, a Greenwich Village club that hosted Monday night performances.[4] In September 1963, the duo performed three new songs, among them "The Sound of Silence", getting the attention of Columbia Records producer Tom Wilson, a young African-American jazz musician who was also helping to guide Bob Dylan's transition from folk to rock.[5][4][6] Simon convinced Wilson to let him and his partner have a studio audition; their performance of "The Sound of Silence" got the duo signed to Columbia.[7]

The song's origin and basis remain unclear, with multiple answers coming forward over the years. Many believe that the song commented on the John F. Kennedy assassination, as the song was recorded three months after the assassination.[4] Simon stated unambiguously in interviews, however, "I wrote The Sound of Silence when I was 21 years old",[8][9] which places the timeframe firmly prior to the JFK tragedy, with Simon also explaining that the song was written in his bathroom, where he turned off the lights to better concentrate.[6] "The main thing about playing the guitar, though, was that I was able to sit by myself and play and dream. And I was always happy doing that. I used to go off in the bathroom, because the bathroom had tiles, so it was a slight echo chamber. I'd turn on the faucet so that water would run (I like that sound, it's very soothing to me) and I'd play. In the dark. 'Hello darkness, my old friend / I've come to talk with you again.'"[10] In a more recent interview with Wynton Marsalis, Simon was directly asked, "How is a 21-year-old person thinkin' about the words in that song?" His reply was, "I have no idea."[11] According to Garfunkel, the song was first developed in November, but Simon took three months to perfect the lyrics, which he claims were entirely written on February 19, 1964.[12] Garfunkel, introducing the song at a live performance (with Simon) in Haarlem, June 1966, summed up the song's meaning as "the inability of people to communicate with each other, not particularly intentionally but especially emotionally, so what you see around you are people unable to love each other."[6] In a recent memoir by Sandy Greenberg, as reviewed in People magazine in December 2020, the song reflected the strong bond he had with his college buddy and best friend, Garfunkel, who adopted the special epithet 'Darkness' so as to empathise with Greenberg's sudden-onset blindness while in college.[13]

To promote the release of their debut album, Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M., the duo performed again at Folk City, as well as two shows at the Gaslight Café, which went over poorly. Dave Van Ronk, a folk singer, was at the performances, and noted that several in the audience regarded their music as a joke.[14] "'Sounds of Silence' actually became a running joke: for a while there, it was only necessary to start singing 'Hello darkness, my old friend ... ' and everybody would crack up."[15] Wednesday Morning, 3 AM sold only 3,000 copies upon its October release, and its dismal sales led Simon to move to London, England.[16] While there, he recorded a solo album, The Paul Simon Songbook (1965), which features a rendition of the song, titled "The Sounds of Silence".[17]

The original recording of the song is in D♯ minor, using the chords D♯m, C♯, B and F♯. Simon plays a guitar with a capo on the sixth fret, using the shapes for Am, G, F and C chords.[18] The vocal span goes from C♯3 to F♯4 in the song.[19]

... The lyrics of the song are written in five stanzas of seven verses each. Each of the stanzas closes with a one verse refrain related to the title lyrics of "the sound of silence". The progress of the lyrics through its five stanzas places the singer into an incrementally increasing tension with an increasingly ambiguous "sound of silence". The irony of using the word "sound" to describe silence in the title lyrics suggests a paradoxical symbolism being used by the singer, which the lyrics of the fourth stanza eventually identifies as "silence like a cancer grows". The "sound of silence" is symbolically taken also to denote the cultural alienation associated with much of the 1960s.[25] In the counterculture movements of the 1960s, the phrase "sound of silence" can be compared to other more commonly used turns of phrase such as "turning a deaf ear" often associated with the detachment experienced with impersonal large governments.

The first stanza presents the singer as taking some relative solace in the peacefulness he associates with "darkness" which is submerged "within" the ambiguous sound of silence.[29] The second stanza has the effect of breaking into the silence with "the flash of a neon light" which leaves the singer "touched" by the enduring ambiguity of the sound of silence. In the third stanza, a "naked light" emerges as a vision of 10,000 people all caught within their own solitude and alienation without any one of them being able to "disturb" the recurring sound of silence.

In the fourth stanza, the singer proclaims in a declarative voice that "silence like a cancer grows", though his words "like silent raindrops fell" without ever being heard against the by now cancerous sound of silence. The fifth stanza appears to culminate with the urgency raised by the declarative voice in the fourth stanza through the apparent triumph of a false "neon god". The false neon god is only challenged when a "sign flashed out its warning" that only the words of the indigent written on "subway walls and tenement halls" could still "whisper" their truth against the recurring and ambiguous form of "the sound of silence".[6] The song has no lyrical bridge or change of key, and was written without any lyrical intro or outro to start or end the song.

"The Sound of Silence" first broke in Boston, where it became one of the top-selling singles in early November 1965;[22][30] it spread to Miami and Washington, D.C. two weeks later, reaching number one in Boston and debuting on the Billboard Hot 100.[31]

Throughout the month of January 1966 "The Sound of Silence" had a one-on-one battle with the Beatles' "We Can Work It Out" for the No. 1 spot on the Billboard Hot 100. The former was No. 1 for the weeks of January 1 and 22 and No. 2 for the intervening two weeks. The latter held the top spot for the weeks of January 8, 15, and 29, and was No. 2 for the two weeks that "The Sound of Silence" was No. 1. Overall, "The Sound of Silence" spent 14 weeks on the Billboard chart.[32]

In the wake of the song's success, Simon promptly returned to the United States to record a new Simon & Garfunkel album at Columbia's request. He later described his experiences learning the song went to No. 1, a story he repeated in numerous interviews:[33]

I had come back to New York, and I was staying in my old room at my parents' house. Artie was living at his parents' house, too. I remember Artie and I were sitting there in my car one night, parked on a street in Queens, and the announcer [on the radio] said, "Number one, Simon & Garfunkel." And Artie said to me, "That Simon & Garfunkel, they must be having a great time." Because there we were on a street corner [in my car in] Queens, smoking a joint. We didn't know what to do with ourselves.[34]

For his part, Garfunkel had a different memory of the song's success:

We were in L.A. Our manager called us at the hotel we were staying at. We were both in the same room. We must have bunked in the same room in those days. I picked up the phone. He said, 'Well, congratulations. Next week you will go from five to one in Billboard.' It was fun. I remember pulling open the curtains and letting the brilliant sun come into this very red room, and then ordering room service. That was good.[33][35]


THIS WEEK'S BIRTHDAYS:

   Happy Birthday today to  Pat Beck Letzinger ('57) of VA AND    Joan Lauterbach Krause ('60) of VA AND   Elaine Wilkinson Bracken ('61) of VA AND My Grandson, Jacob Harty (Pitkin HS, LA - '15) of UT!

   Happy Birthday tomorrow to  Jeanette Parrish Houston ('64) of VA AND Ellen Overton Weiss ('68) of VA!

   Happy Birthday this week to:
02 - Frances Adams Smith ('57) AND   
Dustin Baker (Norview HS - '65) of MA;

03 - Morton Binder ('57);

04 -  Marilyn Moren ('63) of VA;

05 -  Donna Marie Vest Hagerman ('71) of VA AND    My #5 Son, Nathaniel Harty (Hillsboro HS, IL - '97) of MO AND My Grandson (by My Children of Other Parents),   Jonathan Mansfield of TX;

06 - Sarah Puckett Kressaty ('65) of VA AND My First Granddaughter-in-Law, Micaela Gunn Harty (O'Fallon Township HS, IL - '13), of IL;

07 - The late Kathy Pilgrim Clark ('63) (d. 03/08/06)!

    Many Happy Returns, One and All!


THIS DAY IN WWII:

August 31, 1935 - In an attempt to stay out of the growing turmoil in Europe, the United States passed the first of its Neutrality Acts.

August 31, 1939 - Nazi Germany mounted a staged attack on the Gleiwitz radio station, creating an excuse to attack Poland the following day thus starting World War II in Europe.

August 31, 1939 - The British fleet was mobilized.

August 31, 1939 - In London, civilian evacuations began.

August 31, 1941 - Serbian paramilitary forces defeated Germans in the Battle of Loznica.

August 31, 1943 - The USS Harmon, the first U.S. Navy ship to be named after a black person, was commissioned.

August 31, 1944 - The British 8th Army broke through the German's "Gothic Line." The defensive line was drawn across northern Italy.


THIS DAY IN 1971:

August 31, 1971 - TV presenter The Honourable Kirstie Allsopp was born Kirstie Mary Allsopp in Hampshire, England.

August 31, 1971 - Golfer Pádraig Harrington was born Pádraig Peter Harrington in Adelaide, South Australia.

August 31, 1971 -Violinist Vadim Repin was born Viktorovich Repin (Вадим Викторович Репин) in Novosibirsk, Western Siberia, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union.

August 31, 1971 - Comedian and actor Chris Tucker was born Christopher Tucker in Atlanta, Georgia.


From My Friend, Susan, of NC - 08/30/16:

“All of us will be tested. And all of us need true friends to love us, to listen to us, to show us the way, and to testify of truth to us.”

- Henry B. Eyring
(b. 31 May 1933)

    Thanks so much, Susan!


From Joan Lauterbach Krause ('60) of VA - 08/31/17:
 

  Thank you, Joan!
 
 


 From Domi O'Brien ('64) of NH - 08/30/21, 10:38 AM:
 

  Thanks, Domi!
 
 



From My Friend, Mark, of IL -
08/30/21, 7:45 PM:
 

  When a song takes you back in time

   Thanks, Mark!

 
 


 
 From John Murden ('60) of VA - 08/27/19, 1:57 PM:
 

  BRILLIANT! Thank you, John!
 
 


  From My Cousin, Cheryl White Wilson (James Blair HS / John Marshall HS - '64) of VA - 08/30/21, 11:24 AM:

   

Thanks, Cheryl!

 
 


From Margaret Kailos Lee ('67) of NC - 08/29/19, 9:20 AM:
 

  Thanks, Margaret!
 
 


“Outrageous behavior, also known as the lunatic fringe, is the seed bed of innovation and creativity.

- Joel Salatin


BONUS SILENT CROCHET PATTERNS:

Karen Bastille's Quiet Books/Busy Books to Crochet – 13 free patterns



BONUS SILENT KNIT PATTERN:

DROPS'
Silent Woodland Warmer - "Knitted neck warmer with rib and textured pattern in DROPS Polaris."


BONUS SILENT NIGHT RECIPE:

Sheri Castle's Silent Night in the Kitchen - Don't skip the charming introduction just to get to the mouth-watering recipe.


FINALLY:

From www.ajokeaday.com - 08/30/18:

A local veterinarian was known for his wry humor. He surpassed himself one summer day when a woman, who was visiting in town, brought a dog to him after an encounter with a porcupine.

After almost an hour of prying, pulling, cutting and stitching, he returned the dog to its owner, who asked what she owed.

"$150 dollars, ma'am," he answered.

"Now that's simply outrageous!" she stormed. "That's what's wrong with you people, you're always trying to overcharge summer visitors. What do you do in the winter, when there is no one here to overcharge?"

"Raise porcupines, ma'am."


PRAYER ROLL:

http://www.nnhs65.com/requests-prayers.html - updated 06/16/21

BLOG:

http://nnhs.wordpress.com/ - updated 03/13/11



   Y'all take good care of each other! TYPHOONS FOREVER!
We'll Always Have Buckroe!

                          Love to all, Carol

==============================================

NNHS CLASS OF '65 WEB SITE: http://www.nnhs65.com

PERSONAL WEB SITE: http://www.angelfire.com/weird2/cluckmeat

==============================================


Carol Buckley Harty
7020 Lure Court
Fayetteville, NC 28311-9309
910-584-8802

"Never underestimate
the power of a drop
in the bucket."

THREE WAYS TO DONATE:  

1. Visit the main page (http://www.nnhs65.com), scroll halfway down, and click on the Pay Pal Donate Button (nnhs65@gmail.com);

2. Go to www.PayPal.com, log in, select "Send Money (Services) to nnhs65@gmail.com; or

3. Just mail it directly to my home. Thanks! 



The Sound of Silence

Written by Paul Simon (b. 13 Oct 1941) and Art Garfunkel (b. 05 Nov 1941)

Recorded by Simon & Garfunkel, 1964

Later covered by Disturbed in 2015,
and by Pentatonix in 2019.


Hello darkness, my old friend
I've come to talk with you again
Because a vision softly creeping
Left its seeds while I was sleeping
And the vision that was planted in my brain
Still remains within the sound of silence

In restless dreams, I walked alone
Narrow streets of cobblestone
'Neath the halo of a street lamp
I turned my collar to the cold and damp
When my eyes were stabbed by the flash of a neon light
That split the night, and touched the sound of silence

And in the naked light I saw
Ten thousand people, maybe more
People talking without speaking
People hearing without listening
People writing songs that voices never shared
And no one dared disturb the sound of silence

"Fools," said I, "You do not know
Silence like a cancer grows
Hear my words that I might teach you
Take my arms that I might reach you"
But my words, like silent raindrops, fell
And echoed in the wells of silence

And the people bowed and prayed
To the neon god they made
And the sign flashed out its warning
In the words that it was forming
And the sign said, "The words of the prophets are written on the subway walls and tenement halls
And whispered in the sound of silence"


 

"The Sound of Silence" lyrics courtesy of https://genius.com/Simon-and-garfunkel-the-sound-of-silence-lyrics - 08/31/21

"Addicted to Silence" Title Art Image courtesy of https://knops.co/magazine/addiction-to-silence/ - 08/31/21

Black Vine clip art courtesy of

Animated Tiny Birthday Cake clip art courtesy of Sarah Puckett Kressaty ('65) of VA - 08/31/05
Thanks, Sarah Sugah!

Hillsboro High School's Topper (Band Version) clip art courtesy of http://www.hillsboroschools.net/schools/hhs/activities/music2/Band/bio.html - 06/07/08
Thanks, Mark!

O'Fallon Township High School (IL) Logo courtesy of http://www.oths.k12.il.us/pages/O_Fallon_High_School - 06/01/18

John Marshall High School's Justice Scale clip art courtesy of Cheryl White Wilson (JMHS - '64) of VA - 10/13/05 (replaced 02/23/09)
Thanks, Cheryl!

Animated Rolling Cat clip art courtesy of http://www.cybergata.com/anim.htm - page 14 - 11/14/09

Big Grin Smiley courtesy of Domi O'Brien ('64) of NH - 07/05/09
Thanks, Domi!

Animated Laughing Dentures clip art courtesy of Paul Harty (Bardolph HS, IL - '61) of NC - 12/31/18
Thanks, Paul!

Animated Nutsy Smiley courtesy of http://www.hauntedhamilton.com/cgi-bin/scripts/board-image-lister.cgi - 05/04/09

Animated Drooling Smiley courtesy of http://www.hauntedhamilton.com/cgi-bin/scripts/board-image-lister.cgi - 02/16/09

Jeffrey Holman's Image "A Drop in the Bucket" courtesy of https://tearsfromalonelygod.wordpress.com/2009/10/08/a-drop-in-the-bucket/ - 05/23/16

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