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07/29/15 - NNHS Newsletter
Right Back Where We Started From

“Ours is a life of constant reruns. We're always circling back
to where we'd we started, then starting all over again.”

- Joe Henderson
(b. 03 June 1943)

Dear Friends and Schoolmates, 
 
 Do you ever having the feeling that you're living in a time loop and everything is just "déjà vu all over again," or is it just me??  

BONUS - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=op0upKxdvLs - Right Back Where We Started From - Maxine Nightingale - Right Back Where We Started From, 1975


 


From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right_Back_Where_We_Started_From:

"Right Back Where We Started From" is a song written by Pierre Tubbs and J. Vincent Edwards[1] which was first recorded in the middle of 1975 by Maxine Nightingale for whom it was an international hit. In 1989, a remake by Sinitta, then 25, reached #4 in the UK Singles Chart...


 


THIS WEEK'S BIRTHDAYS:

   Happy Birthday tomorrow to   Don Chaney ('66) of FL AND          My Daughter, Adrienne Harty (Hillsboro HS, IL / American School, IL) of NC AND     My Granddaughter, Claire Harty, of CA!

  Happy Birthday this week to:

31 -   Helen Flax Kierstead ('58) of Ontario AND    Anne Sawyer Turpin ('65) of VA;

01 -    The late Bette Lee Heath ('57) (deceased 08/01/12) AND         My Husband, Paul Harty (Bardolph HS, IL - '61) of NC AND    Betty Burton Gary ('65) of VA AND     My Granddaughter, Ashlee Huber, of Alberta;

02 -    Roy Parrish ('61) of CA AND   Eddie Beasley ('64) of Panama AND  the late Sandra Tilles Snyder ('65) (deceased 03/11/99);

04 - The United States Coast Guard - 1790 AND Colleen Luke Barton ('57) of England AND Buzzy Blanchard (Kecoughtan HS - '68) of LA;

05 -   The late Barbara Kemp Bostwick ('57) (deceased  04/22/12) AND   Frank Friedland ('60) of VA!

   Many Happy Returns, One and All!

http://www.nnhs65.com/Happy-Birthday.html


1400 YEARS AGO TODAY:

July 29,  615 - Pakal ascended the throne of Palenque at the age of 12.


450 YEARS AGO TODAY:

July 29, 1565 - The widowed Mary, Queen of Scots, married Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley, Duke of Albany, at Holyrood Palace in Edinburgh, Scotland.


THIS DAY IN WWII:


July 29, 1921 - Adolf Hitler became leader of the National Socialist German Workers Party.


THIS DAY IN 1965:

Thursday, July 29, 1965 - Vietnam War: The first 4,000 101st Airborne Division paratroopers arrived in Vietnam, landing at Cam Ranh Bay.

Thursday, July 29, 1965 - Baseball player and coach Luis Alicea was born Luis René Alicea de Jesús in Santurce, Puerto Rico.

Thursday, July 29, 1965 - Actor, producer, and screenwriter Dean Haglund was born in Oakbank, Manitoba, Canada.

Thursday, July 29, 1965 - Radio host Scott Ferrall was born in Mount Lebanon, Pennsylvania.

Thursday, July 29, 1965 - Captain and politician Adam Holloway was born Adam James Harold Holloway in Faversham, Kent, England.

Thursday, July 29, 1965 - Soccer player Stan Koziol was born Joseph Stanley Koziol in Clifton, New Jersey. He died on March 3, 2014 at the age of 48 following a short battle with leukemia.

Thursday, July 29, 1965 - Author and academic Chang-Rae Lee was born in South Korea.

Thursday, July 29, 1965 - Guitarist and songwriter (Corrosion of Conformity) Woody Weatherman was born Woodroe Weatherman in Raleigh, North Carolina.


“Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of human freedoms -- to choose one's own attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one's own way.”

- Viktor Frankl, Auschwitz survivor
(26 Mar 1905 - 02 Sept 1997)


        From My Husband, Paul Harty (Bardolph HS, IL - '61) of NC - 07/28/15 - "32 Things That Will Disappear In Our Lifetime":

32 THINGS ABOUT TO BECOME EXTINCT IN AMERICA

32. U.S. Post Office
Get ready to imagine a world without the post office. They
are pricing themselves out of existence, and are so deeply in financial trouble that there is probably no way to sustain it long term. Email, Fed Ex, and UPS have just about wiped out the minimum revenue needed to keep the post office alive. Most of your mail every day is junk mail and bills.

31. Yellow Pages
This year will be pivotal for the global Yellow Pages industry. Much like newspapers, print Yellow Pages will continue to bleed dollars to their various digital counterparts, from Internet Yellow Pages (IYPs), to local search engines and combination search/listing services like Reach Local and Yodel Factors like20an acceleration of the print 'fade rate' and the looming recession will contribute to the onslaught. One research firm predicts the falloff in usage of newspapers and print Yellow Pages could even reach 10% this year -- much higher than the 2%-3% fade rate seen in past years.

30. Classified Ads
The Internet has made so many things obsolete that newspaper classified ads might sound like just another trivial item on a long list. But this is one of those harbingers of the future that could signal the end of civilization as we know it. The argument is that if newspaper classifies are replaced by free on-line listings at sites like Craigslist.org and Google Base, then newspapers are not far behind them.

29.  Chesapeake Bay Blue Crabs
Maryland's icon, the blue crab, has been fading away in Chesapeake Bay. In 2008 Maryland saw the lowest harvest (22 million pounds) since 1945. Just four decades ago the bay produced 96 million pounds. The population is down 70% since 1990, when they first did a formal count. There are only about 120 million crabs in the bay and they think they need 200 million for a sustainable population. Over-fishing, pollution, invasive species and global warming get the blame.


28. Ash Trees
In the late 1990's, a pretty, iridescent green species of beetle, now known as the emerald ash borer, hitched a ride to North America with ash wood products imported from eastern Asia. In less than a decade, its larvae have killed millions of trees in the Midwest, and continue to spread. They've killed more than 30 million ash trees in southeastern Michigan alone, with tens of millions more lost in Ohio and Indiana. More than 7.5 billion ash trees are currently at risk.

27. Wild Horses
It is estimated that 100 years ago, as many as two million horses were roaming free within the United States. In 2001, National Geographic News estimated that the wild horse population has decreased to about 50,000 head. Currently, the National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory board states that there are 32,000 free roaming horses in ten Western states, with half of them residing in Nevada. The Bureau of Land Management is seeking to reduce the total number of free range horses to 27,000, possibly by selective euthanasia.

26. Honey Bees
Perhaps nothing on our list of disappearing America is so dire; plummeting so enormously; and so necessary to the survival of our food supply as the honey bee. Very scary. 'Colony Collapse Disorder,' or CCD, has spread throughout the U.S. and Europe over the past few years, wiping out 50% to 90% of the colonies of many beekeepers -- and along with it, their livelihood.

25. The Swimming Hole
Thanks to our litigious society, swimming holes are becoming a thing of the past. '20/20' reports that swimming hole owners, like Robert Every in High Falls, NY, are shutting them down out of worry that if someone gets hurt they'll sue. And that's exactly what happened in Seattle. The city of Bellingham was sued by Katie Hofstetter who was paralyzed in a fall at a popular swimming hole in Whatcom Falls Park. As injuries occur and lawsuits follow, expect more swimming holes to post 'Keep out!' signs.

24. Mumps & Measles
Despite what's been in the news lately, the measles and mumps actually, truly are disappearing from the United States. In 1964, 212,000 cases of mumps were reported in the   U.S. By 1983, this figure had dropped to 3,000, thanks to a vigorous vaccination program. Prior to the introduction of the measles vaccine, approximately half a million cases of measles were reported in the U.S. annually, resulting in 450 deaths. In 2005, only 66 cases were recorded.

23. Answering Machines
The increasing disappearance of answering machines is directly tied to No. 20 on our list -- the decline of landlines. According to USA Today, the number of homes that only use cell phones jumped 159% between 2004 and 2007. It has been particularly bad in New York; since 2000, landline usage has dropped 55%. It's logical that as cell phones rise, many of them replacing traditional landlines, that there will be fewer answering machines.

22. Cameras That Use Film
It doesn't require a statistician to prove the rapid disappearance of the film camera in America. Just look to companies like Nikon, the professional's choice for quality camera equipment. In 2006, it announced that it would stop making film cameras, pointing to the shrinking market -- only 3% of its sales in 2005, compared to 75% of sales from digital cameras and equipment.

21. Incandescent Bulbs
Before a few years ago, the standard 60-watt (or, yikes, 100-watt) bulb was the mainstay of every U.S. home. With the green movement and all-things-sustainable-energy crowd, the Compact Fluorescent Lightbulb (CFL) is largely replacing the older, Edison-era incandescent bulb. The EPA reports that 2007 sales for Energy Star CFLs nearly doubled from 2006, and these sales accounted for approximately 20 percent of the   U.S. light bulb market. And according to USA Today, a new energy bill plans to phase out incandescent bulbs in the next four to 12 years.


20. Stand-Alone Bowling Alleys
Bowling Balls.  US claims there are still 60 million Americans who bowl at least once a year, but many are not bowling in stand-alone bowling alleys. Today most new bowling alleys are part of facilities for all types or recreation including laser tag, go-karts, bumper cars, video game arcades, climbing walls and glow miniature golf. Bowling lanes also have been added to many non-traditional venues such as adult communities, hotels and resorts, and gambling casinos.

19. Movie Rental Stores
While Netflix is looking up at the moment, Blockbuster keeps closing store locations by the hundreds. It still has about 6,000 left across the world, but those keep dwindling and the stock is down considerably in 2008, especially since the company gave up a quest of Circuit City. Movie Gallery, which owned the  Hollywood Video brand, closed up shop earlier this year. Countless small video chains and mom-and-pop stores have given up the ghost already.

18. The Milkman
According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, in 1950, over half of the milk delivered was to the home in quart bottles, by 1963, it was about a third and by 2001, it represented only 0.4% percent. Nowadays most milk is sold through supermarkets in gallon jugs. The steady decline in home-delivered milk is blamed, of course, on the rise of the supermarket, better home refrigeration and longer-lasting milk. Although some milkmen still make the rounds in pockets of the U.S. , they are certainly a dying breed.


17. Dial-up Internet Access
Dial-up connections fellen from 40% in 2001 to 10% in 2008. The combination of an infrastructure to accommodate affordable high speed Internet connections and the disappearing home phone have all but pounded the final nail in the coffin of dial-up Internet access.

16. Phone Land Lines
Unless you have a large family and make a lot of local calls, you don't need it anymore. Most people keep it simply because they've always had it. But you are paying double charges for that extra service. All the cell phone companies will let you call customers using the same cell provider for no charge against your minutes. According to a survey from the National Center for Health Statistics, at the end of 2007, nearly one in six homes was cell-only and, of those homes that had land lines, one in eight only received calls on their cells.

15. VCRs
For the better part of three decades, the VCR was a best-seller and staple in every American household until being completely decimated by the DVD, and now the Digital Video Recorder (DVR). In fact, the only remnants of the VHS age at your local Wal-Mart or Radio Shack are blank VHS tapes these days. Pre-recorded VHS tapes are largely gone and VHS decks are practically nowhere to be found. They served us so well.

14. Ham Radio
Amateur radio operators enjoy personal (and often worldwide) wireless communications with each other and are able to support their communities with emergency and disaster communications if necessary, while increasing their personal knowledge of electronics and radio theory.. However, proliferation of the Internet and its popularity among youth has caused the decline of amateur radio. In the past five years alone, the number of people holding active ham radio licenses has dropped by 50,000, even though Morse Code is no longer a requirement.

13. Hand-Written Letters
In 2006, the Radicati Group estimated that, worldwide, 183 billion e-mails were sent each day. Two million each second. By November of 2007, an estimated 3.3 billion Earthlings owned cell phones, and 80% of the world's population had access to cell phone coverage. In 2004, half-a-trillion text messages were sent, and the number has no doubt increased exponentially since then. So where amongst this gorge of gabble is there room for the elegant, polite hand-written letter?

12. Personal Checks
Britain is already laying the groundwork to do away with checks by 2018. It costs the financial system billions of dollars a year to process checks. Plastic cards and online transactions will lead to the eventual demise of the check. This plays right into the death of the post office. If you never paid your bills by mail and never received them by mail, the post office would absolutely go out of business. According to an American Bankers Assoc. report, a net 23% of consumers plan to decrease their use of checks over the next two years, while a net 14% plan to increase their use of PIN debit. Bill payment remains the last stronghold of paper-based payments -- for the time being. Checks continue to be the most commonly used bill payment method, with 71% of consumers paying at least one recurring bill per month by writing a check. However, a bill-by-bill basis, checks account for only 49% of consumers' recurring bill payments (down from 72% in 2001 and 60% in 2003).

11. Drive-in Theaters
During the peak in 1958, there were more than 4,000 drive-in theaters in this country, but in 2007 only 405 drive-ins were still operating. Exactly zero new drive-ins have been built since 2005. Only one reopened in 2005 and five reopened in 2006, so there isn't much of a movement toward reviving the closed ones.

10
. The Book

You say you will never give up the physical book that you hold in your hand and turn the literal pages. I said the same thing about downloading music from iTunes. I wanted my hard copy CD. But I quickly changed my mind when I discovered that I could get albums for half the price without ever leaving home to get the latest music. The same thing will happen with books. You can browse a bookstore online and even read a preview chapter before you buy. And the price is less than half that of a real book. And think of the convenience! Once you start flicking your fingers on the screen instead of the book, you find that you are lost in the story, can't wait to see what happens next, and you forget that you're holding a gadget instead of a book.

9. News Magazines and TV News
While the TV evening newscasts haven't gone anywhere over the last several decades, their audiences have. In 1984, in a story about the diminishing returns of the evening news, the New York Times reported that all three network evening-news programs combined had only 40.9 million viewers. Fast forward to 2008, and what they have today is half that.

8. Music
This is one of the saddest parts of the change story. The music industry is dying a slow death. Not just because of illegal downloading. It's the lack of innovative new music being given a chance to get to the people who would like to hear it. Greed and corruption is the problem. The record labels and the radio conglomerates are simply self-destructing. Over 40% of the music purchased today is "catalog items," meaning traditional music with which the public is familiar. Older established artists. This is also true on the live concert circuit. To explore this fascinating and disturbing topic further, check out the book, "Appetite for Self-Destruction" by Steve Knopper, and the video documentary, "Before the Music Dies."

7. Analog TV
According to the Consumer Electronics Association, 85% of homes in the U.S. get their television programming through cable or satellite providers. For the remaining 15% -- or 13 million individuals -- who are using rabbit ears or a large outdoor antenna to get their local stations, change is in the air.. If you are one of these people you'll need to get a new TV or a converter box in order to get the new stations which will only be broadcast in = 0 A digital.
(NOTE: This, of course, was completed on June 12, 2009.)

6. Television
Revenues to the networks are down dramatically. Not just because of the economy. People are watching TV and movies streamed from their computers. And they're playing games and doing lots of other things that take up the time that used to be spent watching TV. Prime time shows have degenerated down to lower than the lowest common denominator. Cable rates are skyrocketing and commercials run about every 4 minutes and 30 seconds. I say good riddance to most of it. It's time for the cable companies to be put out of our misery. Let the people choose what they want to watch online and through Netflix. (Are theaters next?)

5
. Newspapers
The younger generation simply doesn't read the newspaper. They certainly don't subscribe to a daily delivered print edition. That may go the way of the milkman and the laundry man [also dry cleaning delivery]. As for reading the paper online, get ready to pay for it. The rise in mobile Internet devices and e-readers has caused all the newspaper publishers to form an alliance. They have met with Apple, Amazon, and the major cell phone companies to develop a model for paid subscription services.

4. The "Things" That You Own
Many of the very possessions that we used to own are still in our lives, but we may not actually own them in the future. They may simply reside in "the cloud." Today your computer has a hard drive and you store your pictures, music, movies, and documents. Your software is on a CD or DVD, and you can always re-install it if need be. But all of that is changing. Apple, Microsoft, and Google are all finishing up their latest "cloud services." That means that when you turn on a computer, the Internet will be built into the operating system. So, Windows, Google, and the Mac OS will be tied straight into the Internet. If you click an icon, it will open something in the Internet cloud. If you save something, it will be saved to the cloud. And you may pay a monthly subscription fee to the cloud provider. In this virtual world, you can access your music or your books, or your whatever from any laptop or handheld device. That's the good news. But, will you actually own any of this "stuff" or will it all be able to disappear at any moment in a big "Poof?" Will most of the things in our lives be disposable and whimsical? It makes you want to run to the closet and pull out that photo album, grab a book from the shelf, or open up a CD case and pull out the insert.

3. Joined Handwriting (Cursive Writing)
Already gone in some schools who no longer teach "joined handwriting" because nearly everything is done now on computers or keyboards of some type (pun not intended).

2. Privacy
If there ever was a concept that we can look back on nostalgically, it would be privacy. That's gone. It's been gone for a long time anyway... There are cameras on the street, in most of the buildings, on most policemen (and maybe soon everyday civilians will be wearing them) and even built into your computer and cell phone. But you can be sure that 24/7, "They" know who you are and where you are, right down to the GPS coordinates, and the Google Street View. If you buy something, your habit is put into a zillion profiles, and your ads will change to reflect those habits... "They" will try to get you to buy something else. Again and again and again!

1.The Family Farm
Since the 1930's, the number of family farms has been declining rapidly. According to the USDA, 5.3 million farms dotted the nation in 1950, but this number had declined to 2.1 million by the 2003 farm census (data from the 2007 census hasn't yet been published). Ninety-one percent of the U.S. FARMS are small Family Farms.

A couple more that I think will disappear:

Clocks… a lot of kids these days can’t read one…unless it is “digital”.

The phrase “your shoe laces are untied”. This will go the way of the dodo bird. Most kids can’t tie their shoes. I used to think it was a fashion statement, but now I’m convinced they just don’t know how.

Both interesting and saddening, isn't it? Glad we lived when we did.

   YOWZERS-WOWZERS - INDEED! Thanks, Paul! Some of these were quite a surprise to me, whereas a couple of them I thought had already gone!  


 


  From Elizabeth Tedder Nunnally ('65 / '68) of VA - 07/28/15 - "Sometimes...":

      BOY HOWDY! Thank you, Elizabeth!  
 
 


 


From My Daughter of Other Parents, Ashley, of AZ - 07/28/15 - "Pretending":

      EXACTLY! Thanks, Ashley!  
 
 


 


“If the world was perfect, it wouldn't be.

- Yogi Berra
(
b. 12 May 1925)


        From My Husband, Paul Harty (Bardolph HS, IL - '61) of NC -  07/23/15 - "These Will Make You Smile (#4 in a series of 25)":

  Thanks, Haul Party!
Just ONE more and I'd have a dozen!
 


 


BONUS BACK CROCHET PATTERNS:

http://mymerrymessylife.com/2014/07/crochet-christmas-in-july-free-pattern-roundup.html - Sara's Crochet Christmas in July – Free Pattern Roundup! - "It’s July…time to start preparing for Christmas, right? Some of you have already started, you organized Martha-Stewarts out there. For the rest of us, we’re just now dusting off our sparkly red and green yarn, only to put it back as we can barely wrap our heads around Christmas while it’s 90 degrees outside!"


BONUS BACK TO BASICS RECIPES:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/shows/barefoot-contessa/recipes.html - The Barefoot Contessa's (Ina Garten) Back to Basics Recipes - "Get your favorite recipes featured on Barefoot Contessa on Food Network."


FINALLY:
From www.ajokeaday.com - 07/28/15:

A family was having dinner and the little boy said, "Dad, I don't like the holes in the cheese!"

Dad replied, "Well, son, eat the cheese and leave the holes on the side of the plate."


DATES TO REMEMBER:

1. Wednesday, September 9, 2015 - The NNHS Class of June 1942 meets at noon on the second Wednesday of every other month for a Dutch treat lunch at the James River Country Club, 1500 Country Club Road. PLEASE JOIN THEM. Give or take a few years makes no difference. Good conversation, food and atmosphere. For details, call Jennings Bryan at 803-7701 for reservations.

2. Friday and Saturday, September 25 and 26, 2015 - The Warwick HS Class of 1960 will hold its 55-Year Reunion. Friday night: at the Warwick Yacht Club; Saturday night: James River Country Club. DETAILS: WWW.WARWICKFARMERS.COM

3. Friday and Saturday, October 16 and 17, 2015 - The NNHS Class of 1965 will hold its 50-Year Reunion at the Marriott at City Center, 740 Town Center Drive, Newport News. Friday night will be open to all graduates of NNHS; Saturday night will be reserved for 1965 Class members and their guests.
http://.www.nnhs1965typhoon.myevent.com/; http://nnhs65.com/reunion-class-of-1965/50-Year-Reunion-Letter-2015.docx 

CONTACT: Lynn Walker Brothers @ brothersbc@msn.com or Pauline Collins Shofner @ pcshofner@verizon.net.


PRAYER ROLL:

http://www.nnhs65.com/requests-prayers.html - updated 07/25/15

BLOG:

http://nnhs.wordpress.com/ - updated 03/13/11


  
Y'all take good care of each other!  TYPHOONS FOREVER!  We'll Always Have Buckroe
!

                          Love to all, Carol

==============================================

NNHS CLASS OF '65 WEB SITE: http://www.nnhs65.com

PERSONAL WEB SITE: http://www.angelfire.com/weird2/cluckmeat

==============================================


 

Carol Buckley Harty
7020 Lure Court
Fayetteville, NC 28311-9309
910-584-8802


THREE WAYS TO DONATE:  

1. Visit the main page (http://www.nnhs65.com), scroll halfway down, and click on the Pay Pal Donate Button (nnhs65@gmail.com);

2. Go to www.PayPal.com, log in, select "Send Money (Services) to nnhs65@gmail.com; or

3. Just mail it directly to my home. Thanks!    
             




Right Back Where We Started From
 

Written by Pierre Tubbs and J. Vincent Edwards Recorded by Maxine Nightingale (b. 03 Nov 1952), 1975
 

Ooo and it's alright and it's comin' 'long
We got to get right back to where we started from
Love is good, love can be strong
We got to get right back to where we started from

Oh-ohhhhh
Do you remember that day
(That sunny day)
When you first came my way
I said no one could take your place
And if you get hurt
(If you get hurt)
By the little things I say
I can put that smile back on your face

Ooo and it's alright and it's comin' 'long
We got to get right back to where we started from
Love is good, love can be strong
We got to get right back to where we started from

A love like ours
(A love like ours)
Can never fade away
You know it's only just begun
You give me your love
(Give me your love)
I just can't stay away
I know that you're the only one

(Chorus)
 


 


"Right Back Where We Started From" midi courtesy of http://www.mightymidi.com/songs2.html at the suggestion of My #5 Son, Nathaniel Harty of IL - 08/05/12

"Right Back Where We Started From" lyrics courtesy of http://www.stlyrics.com/lyrics/familystone/rightbackwherewestartedfrom.htm - 08/05/12

"Back" Image courtesy of http://www.btbonline.co.nz/meetbrick.html - 08/06/12

Animated Nutsy Smiley courtesy of http://www.hauntedhamilton.com/cgi-bin/scripts/board-image-lister.cgi - 05/04/09

Animated Pastel Hearts Divider Line clip art courtesy of... ah, someone, sometime.....

Animated Tiny Birthday Cake clip art courtesy of Sarah Puckett Kressaty ('65) of VA - 08/31/05
Thanks, Sarah Sugah!

Navy Seal clip art courtesy of http://www.onemileup.com/miniSeals.asp - 05/29/06

Hillsboro High School's Topper (Band Version) clip art courtesy of http://www.hillsboroschools.net/schools/hhs/activities/music2/Band/bio.html - 06/07/08
Thanks, Mark!

American School Logo courtesy of http://www.americanschoolofcorr.com/grads.asp - 09/05/06

Army Seal clip art courtesy of Al Farber ('64) of GA - 05/24/06 (still missing...)
Thanks, Al!
Replaced by Norm Covert ('61) of MD - 02/09/09
Thanks, Norm!

Coast Guard Seal clip art courtesy of http://www.tioh.hqda.pentagon.mil/SealsEmblems/USCG.htm - 10/03/07

Animated Energizer Bunny courtesy of http://www.sodahead.com/ - 07/09/12

Animated Cheering Smiley clip art courtesy of Al Farber ('64) of GA - 08/18/05 (re-saved 02/27/09)
Thanks, Al!

Big Grin Smiley courtesy of Domi O'Brien ('64) of NH - 07/05/09
Thanks, Domi!

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