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07/26/13 - NNHS Newsletter -
My Foolish Heart

“I watched my foolish heart expand
In the lazy glow of benevolence,
O'er the various modes of man's belief.
”

- Robert Browning
(07 May 1812 - 12 Dec 1889)

Dear Friends and Schoolmates,

     This is one of        my sister's (Eleanor Buckley Nowitzky - '59 - of NC) favorite songs, so I always like to use it for her birthday.

     Happy Birthday, Lady!  

BONUS #1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypFC8Q5f1C0 - My Foolish Heart - Margaret Whiting

BONUS #2 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pj2suf5Fs74 - My Foolish Heart - Al Martino

BONUS #3 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3r2RiEYPpEE - My Foolish Heart - Karen Souza


HEALTH UPDATES:

1.           My Husband, Paul Harty (Bardolph HS, IL - '61) of NC - 07/25/13:

   We went to see Paul's surgeon, the magnificent Dr. Debi Chaudhuri, yesterday morning, and as he passed us in the hall, he said, "Good news for you!"  When we met with him he said the reports were all in, and that no cancer remained. WHOO-HOO!

   We will visit him again on Wednesday, July 31 to check on the healing process. 

http://www.nnhs65.com/requests-prayers.html
 


2.      Me ('65) of NC - 07/26/13:

   I had a CT scan of my lungs done this morning.  It was fast (three-minutes), easy, and painless, but I won't know the results for few days.  Meanwhile, I continue to be congested...


ANNOUNCEMENT:

    From Jimmy Smith ('62 / '63) of VA - 07/12/13, 2:29 PM - "    BOBBY BALL, NNHS '63":

CAROL,

WOULD YOU PLEASE POST THE FOLLOWING:

WE ARE GOING TO HAVE A GET TOGETHER FOR BOBBY ON TUESDAY, AUGUST 13TH, 6:30 PM AT ANGELO'S ON J. CLYDE MORRIS BOULEVARD.

MOST OF US HAVE NOT SEEN BOBBY IN 50 YEARS. IF ANYONE WISHES TO COME, PLEASE CONTACT ME AT TYPHOONJIM44@JUNO.COM  OR 757-438-0287. I WILL NEED TO FURNISH A HEAD COUNT TO ANGELO'S.

THANK YOU,
JIMMY SMITH

     WHAT SUPER FUN! Thanks, Jimmy! Here ya go! Y'all have a great time, and tell Bobby Hi for me!


THIS WEEK'S BIRTHDAYS:

   Happy Birthday today to        My Sister, Eleanor Buckley Nowitzky ('59) of NC AND     Bill Roady ('60) of VA AND Joyce Williams Nettles ('63) of VA!

   Happy Birthday tomorrow to Harry Horace (Crystal River HS, FL - '65) of FL AND My Granddaughter (by My Children of Other Parents),    Katelyn Mansfield of MD!

   Happy Birthday this week to:

30 -   Don Chaney ('66) of MD AND        My Daughter, Adrienne Harty (Hillsboro HS, IL / American School, IL) of NC (temporarily of MA)  AND   My Granddaughter, Claire;

31 -   Helen Flax Kierstead ('58) of Ontario AND    Anne Sawyer Turpin ('65) of VA;

01 -    The late Bette Lee Heath ('57) (deceased 08/01/12) AND         My Husband, Paul Harty (Bardolph HS, IL - '61) of NC AND    Betty Burton Gary ('65) of VA;

02 -    Roy Parrish ('61) of CA AND   Eddie Beasley ('64) of Panama AND  the late Sandra Tilles Snyder ('65) (deceased 03/11/99) !

   Many Happy Returns, One and All!

http://www.nnhs65.com/Happy-Birthday.html


THIS DAY IN WWII:

July 26, 1941 - In response to the Japanese occupation of French Indo-China, US President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered the seizure of all Japanese assets in the United States.

July 26, 1944 - The Soviet army entered Lviv, a major city in western Ukraine, liberating it from the Nazis. Only 300 Jews survived out of 160,000 living in Lviv prior to occupation

July 26, 1944 - The first German V-2 rocket hit Great Britain.

July 26, 1945 -
The Labour Party won the United Kingdom general election of July 5 by a landslide, removing Winston Churchill from power.

July 26, 1945 - The Potsdam Declaration was signed in Potsdam, Germany.

July 26, 1945 - HMS Vestal was the last British Royal Navy ship to be sunk in the Second World War.

July 26, 1945 - The US Navy cruiser USS Indianapolis arrived at Tinian with parts of the warhead for the Hiroshima atomic bomb.


THIS DAY IN 1963:

Friday, July 26, 1963 - Syncom 2, the world's first geosynchronous satellite, was launched from Cape Canaveral on a Delta B booster.

Friday, July 26, 1963 - An earthquake in Skopje, Yugoslavia (now in Macedonia) left 1,100 dead.

Friday, July 26, 1963 - The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development voted to admit Japan.

Friday, July 26, 1963 - Curler Jeff Stoughton was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.



NEW ON SITE:

WAY BACK THEN:

THEN:

 

 

http://www.nnhs65.com/SITE-MAP.html

     http://www.nnhs65.com/old-stomping.html

          http://www.nnhs65.com/OOSG-C-G.html

               http://www.nnhs65.com/epes-stationery-store.html - brand new page!

June 1947 Anchor, p.120

1957 Anchor, p.181

07/26/13

07/26/13


      From Joe Madagan ('57) of FL - 07/25/13 - "Famous Marine":

Hi, Carol:

 

Bea Arthur (nee Bernice Frankel) (1922-2009) SSgt. USMC 1943-45 WW II. Enlisted and assigned as typist at Marine HQ in Wash DC, then air stations in VA and NC. Best remembered for her title role in the TV series Maude and as Dorothy in "Golden Girls".

TYPHOON Regards,
Joe Madagan ('57) of FL

   WOWZERONI!   Thanks so much, Adonis! Ms. Arthur has of course been on our Famous Marines page since its inception ten years ago, but I was never able to locate a photo of her in uniform before! This page is much better now:

http://www.nnhs65.com/SITE-MAP.html

     http://www.nnhs65.com/famous-marines.html

          http://www.nnhs65.com/famous-marines-A-F.html

 
 



   From the Most Talented Boy in the Class of 1954, Jack Nelson of Northern VA - 07/25/13 - "Impressive Vietnam War Web site":

  Vietnam Wall

First click on a state. When it opens, scroll down to the city and the names will appear.

Then click on their names. It should show you a picture of the person, or at least their bio and medals.

This really is an amazing web site. Someone spent a lot of time and effort to create it.


http://www.virtualwall.org/iStates.htm

Vietnam Wall
 

I hope that everyone who receives this appreciates what those who served in Vietnam sacrificed for our country.

The link below is a virtual wall of all those lost during the Vietnam war with the names, bio's and other information on our lost heroes. Those who remember that time frame, or perhaps lost friends or family can look them up on this site.

You may wish to pass this link on to others so they have the opportunity to look up loved ones, also, as many knew wonderful people whose names are listed.


  
This is definitely sobering, Jack! Thank you so much for sharing it with us again!


        From My Husband, Paul Harty (Bardolph HS, IL - '61) of NC - 07/25/13 - "HISTORY OF THE CAR RADIO":

HISTORY OF THE CAR RADIO

Seems like cars have always had radios, but they didn't, and here's the true story:

One evening, in 1929, two young men named William Lear and Elmer Wavering drove their girlfriends to a lookout point high above the Mississippi River town of Quincy, Illinois to watch the sunset.

It was a romantic night to be sure, but one of the women observed that it would be even nicer if they could listen to music in the car.

Lear and Wavering liked the idea. Both men had tinkered with radios (Lear had served as a radio operator in the U.S. Navy during World War II) and it wasn't long before they were taking apart a home radio and trying to get it to work in a car.

But it wasn't as easy as it sounds: automobiles have ignition switches, generators, spark plugs, and other electrical equipment that generate noisy static interference, making it nearly impossible to listen to the radio when the engine was running.

SIGNING ON

One by one, Lear and Wavering identified and eliminated each source of electrical interference. When they finally got their radio to work, they took it to a radio convention in Chicago.

There they met Paul Galvin, owner of Galvin Manufacturing Corporation. He made a product called a "battery eliminator" a device that allowed battery-powered radios to run on household AC current. But as more homes were wired for electricity, more radio manufacturers made AC-powered radios.

Galvin needed a new product to manufacture. When he met Lear and Wavering at the radio convention, he found it.

He believed that mass-produced, affordable car radios had the potential to become a huge business. Lear and Wavering set up shop in Galvin's factory, and when they perfected their first radio, they installed it in his Studebaker.

Then Galvin went to a local banker to apply for a loan. Thinking it might sweeten the deal, he had his men install a radio in the banker's Packard. Good idea, but it didn't work -- half an hour after the installation, the banker's Packard caught on fire. (They didn't get the loan.)

Galvin didn't give up. He drove his Studebaker nearly 800 miles to Atlantic City to show off the radio at the 1930 Radio Manufacturers Association convention.

Too broke to afford a booth, he parked the car outside the convention hall and cranked up the radio so that passing conventioneers could hear it. That idea worked -- he got enough orders to put the radio into production.

*WHAT'S IN A NAME*

The first production model was called the 5T71. Galvin decided he needed to come up with something a little catchier. In those days many companies in the phonograph and radio businesses used the suffix "ola" for their names - Radiola, Columbiola, and Victrola were three of the biggest. Galvin decided to do the same thing, and since his radio was intended for use in a motor vehicle, he decided to call it the Motorola.

But even with the name change, the radio still had problems: When Motorola went on sale in 1930, it cost about $110 uninstalled, at a time when you could buy a brand-new car for $650, and the country was sliding into the Great Depression. (By that measure, a radio for a new car would cost about $3,000 today.)

In 1930 it took two men several days to put in a car radio -- The dashboard had to be taken apart so that the receiver and a single speaker could be installed, and the ceiling had to be cut open to install the antenna.

These early radios ran on their own batteries, not on the car battery, so holes had to be cut into the floorboard to accommodate them. The installation manual had eight complete diagrams and 28 pages of instructions.

HIT THE ROAD

Selling complicated car radios that cost 20 percent of the price of a brand-new car wouldn't have been easy in the best of times, let alone during the Great Depression -- Galvin lost money in 1930 and struggled for a couple of years after that. But things picked up in 1933 when Ford began offering Motorola's pre-installed at the factory. In 1934 they got another boost when Galvin struck a deal with B.F. Goodrich tire company to sell and install them in its chain of tire stores.

By then the price of the radio, installation included, had dropped to $55. The Motorola car radio was off and running. (The name of the company would be officially changed from Galvin Manufacturing to "Motorola" in 1947.)

In the meantime, Galvin continued to develop new uses for car radios. In 1936, the same year that it introduced push-button tuning, it also introduced the Motorola Police Cruiser, a standard car radio that was factory preset to a single frequency to pick up police broadcasts.

In 1940 he developed with the first handheld two-way radio -- The Handie-Talkie -- for the U. S. Army.

A lot of the communications technologies that we take for granted today were born in Motorola labs in the years that followed World War II.

In 1947 they came out with the first television to sell under $200. In 1956 the company introduced the world's first pager; in 1969 it supplied the radio and television equipment that was used to televise Neil Armstrong's first steps on the Moon. In 1973 it invented the world's first handheld cellular phone.

Motorola became one of the largest cell phone manufacturer in the world -- and it all started with the car radio.

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO:

The two men who installed the first radio in Paul Galvin's car? Elmer Wavering and William Lear ended up taking very different paths in life.

Wavering stayed with Motorola. In the 1950's he helped change the automobile experience again when he developed the first automotive alternator, replacing inefficient and unreliable generators. The invention lead to such luxuries as power windows, power seats, and eventually air-conditioning.

Lear also continued inventing. He holds more than 150 patents. Remember eight-track tape players? Lear invented that. But what he's really famous for are his contributions to the field of aviation.. He invented radio direction finders for planes, aided in the invention of the autopilot, designed the first fully automatic aircraft landing system, and in 1963 introduced his most famous invention of all, the Lear Jet, the world's first mass-produced, affordable business jet. (Not bad for a guy who dropped out of school after the eighth grade.)

Sometimes it is fun to find out how some of the many things that we take for granted actually came into being, and It all started with a woman's suggestion!


 
  WOWZERONI! Thanks so much, Haul Party!

http://www.radiomuseum.org/forum/first_car_radios_history_and_development_of_early_car_radios.html

http://www.caranddriver.com/features/the-history-of-car-radios 


From My Friend, Katie, of UT - 07/25/13 - "There Comes a Time...":
 

 

SO TRUE!   Thanks, Katie!

 
 


  From Joyce Lawrence Cahoon ('65) of VA - 07/18/13 - "Please keep this going (#7 in a series of 7)":

 
Happiness  is always there within reach, no matter how long it  lasts
.   Let's enjoy life and  don't live a complicated life.  Life is too  short.  Work as if it was your first day.   Forgive as soon as possible.  Love without  boundaries.  Laugh without control and never stop  smiling.  Please pray for those suffering from  cancer.  Keep this going. 

   GIGGLES AND AMEN! Thanks, Joyce - these have been fun!
 

 
 


BONUS FOOLISH HEART CROCHET PATTERN:

http://www.pepika.com/free-patterns/crochet-heart.html - 3D Heart - "Let your imagination guide you and you'll find all kinds of uses for these crocheted hearts. They make wonderful pendants or can be used for earring drops. Use them to make lovely pins, key chains, cell phone or bag charms. Hang on your pet’s collar or your Christmas tree... no matter what you use them for, they look great. "


BONUS FOOLISH HEART RECIPE:

http://www.bettycrocker.com/recipes/frozen-foolish-royal-mess/07ba8214-112b-49f9-8643-4447660894df - Frozen Foolish Royal Mess - "Two traditional British desserts, a "fool" and a "mess," combine for the ultimate frozen delight."


FINALLY:

From www.ajokeaday.com - 07/25/13:
 

Two old men were sitting in the yard outside the care home one day when Tim turned to the other and said, "John, I'm really feeling my age today. I just hurt all over. How are you feeling?"

John replied, "I feel just like a new born babe."

Tim looked at him, startled. "A new born babe, really?"

"Yep, I have no hair, no teeth, and I think I just wet my pants." 


DATES TO REMEMBER:
1. Thursday, August 1, 2013 - The NNHS Class of 1955 holds Lunch Bunch gatherings on the first Thursday of every month at Steve & John's Steak House on Jefferson Avenue just above Denbigh Boulevard in Newport News at 11:00 AM. The luncheon is not limited to just the Class of '55; if you have friends in that year, go visit with them.

2. Tuesday, August 13, 2013 - Get Together for Bobby Ball ('63) at 6:30 PM at Angelo's on J. Clyde Morris Boulevard. CONTACT: Jimmy Smith at typhoonjim44@juno.com or 757-438-0287. He will need to furnish a head count to Angelo's.

3. Wednesday, August 14, 2013 - The NNHS Class of June 1942 meets at noon on the second Wednesday of every other month for a Dutch treat lunch at the James River Country Club, 1500 Country Club Road. PLEASE JOIN THEM. Give or take a few years makes no difference. Good conversation, food and atmosphere. For details, call Jennings Bryan at 803-7701 for reservations.

4. Friday and Saturday, October 4 and 5, 2013 - The NNHS Class of 1963 will hold their 50-Year Reunion at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, Hampton on the Water. Friday night will also be open to the Classes of 1962 and 1964. SEE: The website which has been set up for their class at www.nnhs1963.com; CONTACT: Frank Gibson, frankgibson@cox.net, Joyce Williams Nettles, joywnet@cox.net, or Susie Overton Jones, tnsjones@charter.net; FORM: Registration-Classes-of-1962-and-1964-B.docx


PRAYER ROLL:

http://www.nnhs65.com/requests-prayers.html - updated 07/26/13

BLOG:

http://nnhs.wordpress.com/ - updated 03/13/11


 
  
Y'all take care of each other!  TYPHOONS FOREVER!  We'll Always Have Buckroe!

                                 Love to all, Carol

==============================================

NNHS CLASS OF '65 WEB SITE: http://www.nnhs65.com

PERSONAL WEB SITE: http://www.angelfire.com/weird2/cluckmeat

==============================================



Carol Buckley Harty
7020 Lure Court
Fayetteville, NC 28311-9309
915-780-3048
 


THREE WAYS TO DONATE:  

1. Visit the main page (http://www.nnhs65.com), scroll halfway down, and click on the Pay Pal Donate Button (nnhs65@gmail.com);

2. Go to www.PayPal.com, log in, select "Send Money (Services) to nnhs65@gmail.com; or

3. Just mail it directly to my home. Thanks!    
             


My Foolish Heart

Music by Victor Young (08 Aug 1899 or 1900 – 10 Nov 1956)

Words by Ned Washington (15 Aug 1901 – 20 Dec 1976), 1949


The night is like a lovely tune, beware my foolish heart!
How white the ever constant moon, take care, my foolish heart!
There's a line between love and fascination,
That's hard to see on an evening such as this,
For they give the very same sensation.
When you are lost in the passion of a kiss.
Your lips are much too close to mine, beware my foolish heart!
But should our eager lips combine, then let the fire start.
For this time it isn't fascination, or a dream that will fade and fall apart,
It's love this time, it's love, my foolish heart!


"My Foolish Heart" midi courtesy of http://www.thejazzpage.de/indexflash.html located for us by Dave Spriggs ('64) of VA -  07/08/06
Thanks, Dave!

"My Foolish Heart" lyrics courtesy
of http://www.oldielyrics.com/lyrics/frank_sinatra/my_foolish_heart.html also located for us by Dave Spriggs ('64) of VA - 07/08/06
Thanks again, Dave!

"Foolish Heart" Logo courtesy of http://epguides.com/FoolishHeart/ - 07/23/06

Peach Heart Divider Line clip art courtesy of http://members.tripod.com/~emelinda/index-12.html - 07/18/04

Navy Seal clip art courtesy of http://www.onemileup.com/miniSeals.asp - 05/29/06

Army Seal clip art courtesy of Al Farber ('64) of GA - 05/24/06 (still missing...)
Thanks, Al!
Replaced by Norm Covert ('61) of MD - 02/09/09
Thanks, Norm!

Air Force Seal clip art courtesy of http://www1.va.gov/opa/feature/celebrate/milsongs.htm - 07/07/06

Animated Yehaa Typhoon clip art courtesy of Al Farber ('64) of GA - 08/18/05
Thanks, Al!

Animated Tiny Birthday Cake clip art courtesy of Sarah Puckett Kressaty ('65) of VA - 08/31/05
Thanks, Sarah Sugah!

Hillsboro High School's Topper (Band Version) clip art courtesy of http://www.hillsboroschools.net/schools/hhs/activities/music2/Band/bio.html - 06/07/08
Thanks, Mark!

American School Logo courtesy of http://www.americanschoolofcorr.com/grads.asp - 09/05/06

Marine Corps Seal clip art courtesy of the late Herbert Hice of MI - one of my Famous Marines who served in the South Pacific during WWII.
Thanks again, Herbie!!

Animated USMC Flag clip art courtesy of http://www.angelfire.com/ny4/KevsGifsGalore/Patriotic.html - 06/18/03

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