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March

03/04/13 - NNHS Newsletter -
March Forth on the Fourth

“March on. Do not tarry. To go forward is to move toward perfection.
March on, and fear not the thorns, or the sharp stones on life's path.

- Kahlil Gibran
(06 Jan 1883 - 10 Apr 1931)

March

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4:3Q 11:N 19:1Q 27:F

4:3Q 11:N 19:1Q 27:F

Dear Friends and Schoolmates, 

   Today is the only day of the year which when spoken in English forms a sentence. 
And that, of course, is cause enough for celebration today - just as it has been for the last four years.

BONUS - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHFf7NIwOHQ - Radetzky March - Johann Strauss Sr. "Radetzky March", the last piece at the New Year's Concert Vienna 1987, with Herbert Von Karajan conducting the Vienna Philharmonic AND THE AUDIENCE!


From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radetzky_March:

Radetzky March, Op. 228, is a march composed by Johann Strauss Sr. in 1848. It was dedicated to the Austrian Field Marshal Joseph Radetzky von Radetz, and became quite a popular march among soldiers. It has been remarked that its tone is more celebratory than martial-- Strauss was commissioned to write the piece for a celebration of Radetsky's victory at the Battle of Custoza.

For the Trio Strauss used an older folk melody called „Alter Tanz aus Wien“ or „Tinerl-Lied“ in 3/4 time signature (named after a then popular singer). When Radetzky came back to Vienna after winning the battle of Custoza (1848), his soldiers were singing the then popular song. Allegedly Strauss heard this singing and included the melody, this time in 2/4 time signature, into the Radetzky march. [1]

When it was first played in front of Austrian officers they spontaneously clapped and stamped their feet when they heard the chorus. This tradition is kept alive today when the march is played in classical music venues in Vienna, among members of the audience who are familiar with the tradition. It is almost always played as the last piece at the Neujahrskonzert, the Vienna New Year Concert...


THIS WEEK'S BIRTHDAYS:

   Happy Birthday today to   The late Mr. William Etheridge (NNHS Principal) (deceased - 04/19/05) AND   Roland McCoy (June '45) of VA!

   Happy Birthday tomorrow to   Hazel Pegram Southall ('57) AND    Helen Pegram Ignace ('57) AND   Jeanie Scruggs Anderson ('65) of VA!

   Happy Birthday this week to:

07 -   Shirley Eanes Matthews ('66) of VA;

08 -    The late Mildred Mae Linkous Spriggs (June '38) (deceased 07/04/07) - also Mother of        Dave Spriggs ('64) of VA AND Doris Burns ('38) - also Mother of    Steve Burns ('65) of MN;

09 - Patrick Burke ('57) AND   Bobby Hilling ('62) of VA AND   Katie Haan Spaulding ('64) of CA;

10 -   Helen Avant Neal ('57) of VA AND (if Plaxo is to be believed) Bill Douthat ('66) of VA;

   Many Happy Returns to You All!

http://nnhs65.com/Happy-Birthday.html


THIS DAY IN WWII:

March 04, 1941 - The United Kingdom launched Operation Claymore on the Lofoten Islands.

March 04, 1943 - The Battle of the Bismarck Sea in the South West Pacific came to an end.

March 04, 1944 - After the success of Big Week, the USAAF began a daylight bombing campaign of Berlin.

March 04, 1945 - Lapland War: Finland declared war on Nazi Germany.


THIS DAY IN 1963:
Monday, March 04, 1963 - Politician Barbara Bubula was born in Kraków, Poland.

Monday, March 04, 1963 - Singer and bassist Jason Newsted (Metallica, Voivod) was born in Battle Creek, Michigan

Monday, March 04, 1963 - Actor Daniel Roebuck was born Daniel James Roebuck in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.

Monday, March 04, 1963 - Poet William Carlos Williams (born 17 Sept 1883 in Rutherford, New Jersey) died in Rutherford, New Jersey at the age of 79.


      From Harry Covert ('57) of MD - 03/03/13 - "My Word - Miss Martin and Lou Gehrig, No. 3, Baseball’s First Iron Man":

My Word

Miss Martin and Lou Gehrig

No. 3, Baseball’s First Iron Man

By Harry M. Covert

Usually on Thursdays in the spring, Miss Martin read Homer’s Iliad to her sixth graders at John W. Daniel School. The windows were raised and we little tykes hoped a breeze would flow through the room. We didn’t have air conditioning in 1950.

Miss Martin favored white tee-shirts all the time and looked exactly like Benjamin Franklin. No kidding. When I look at a $100 bill today, I see her staring right at me. If any of us 30-plus pupils had been caught misbehaving a bit, she didn’t keep us after class, which they could do easily in those days. Instead, she had her own clever punishment — three or four long-division arithmetic problems: dividing long numbers like 899,765,343 by 1487.

This was a challenge to a 10-year-old, especially if you had to turn them in the next morning. We were a bunch of sweet attentive boys and girls, seldom if ever drawing the ire of our teacher who never missed a day.

We loved the Iliad stories as Miss Martin read to us out loud. Usually once a month, she would give a little quiz, not for grades but to see if we were paying attention about Achilles and the Trojan Horse. If we needed a little help with the answers, she could show a soft side and help us.

Miss Martin came to my mind recently when Cal Ripken Jr. visited Frederick, Md.. Gehrig was the Yankees’ famed No. 4, the first iron man who played 2,130 consecutive games from June 1, 1925 to April 30, 1939. This record remained for 61 years until Cal broke it September 19, 1998, at 2,632.

On that day, July 4, 1939 Gehrig was forced to retire because of what we know today as Lou Gehrig’s Disease. He died at age 38 in 1941.

In Miss Martin’s class some 63 years ago, I remember vividly as we pulled out the Iliad for our afternoon session. She began in a pleasant reading manner. Today it seems she reached the Trojan Horse part when I slipped in front of my book, the 1942 orange-covered biography of Lou Gehrig. As she droned on, I forgot about the Iliad. I got lost in the story where little Lou went eel fishing for his mother in the World War I era. He’d bring home his catch, his mother would pickle them and then Lou returned to Second Avenue in East Harlem, New York City, to sell the goodies.

I “traveled” that afternoon with Lou as he grew to be a star football player at Columbia and then went on to became the baseball hero of the Yankees.

Suddenly, I heard a voice, “What page are you on?” Miss Martin roared. Naturally I thought she was talking to someone else. I stuttered a bit, tried to sneak Gehrig back in my lap. She kept on, “Can you tell me about the Trojans?” Fear struck at the moment. My classmates laughed.

In my book that afternoon it was 1932, not with the Greeks. Gehrig had just hit four home runs in a game against the Philadelphia Athletics, the first player to do so in the 20th century.

Miss Martin ordered me to the front of class. She seized my Gehrig book. My penalty was to collect all of the Homer’s Iliad books from the class.

She apparently forgot to give me the long-division problems. The next morning, she allowed us to go to the library. It was  Principal Thomas E. Baines who returned the Gehrig book to me. His advice was short and sweet: don’t read it in Miss Martin’s class.”

To this day I’ve never eaten eels. ©

   Thanks so much for this delightful tale, Harry! Strangely enough, I remember checking this book out of the Magruder School library and reading it myself, though I was in the fourth grade when I did it. It's strange because I had (if possible) a less than zero interest in baseball (except for my superb collection of pretty baseball cards, of course - a separate matter altogether).  I read it because my classmate Dave Sanders was enthralled with it (and with Gehrig himself), and gave a glowing book report on it.

   Dave was an interesting boy.  He spoke with a heavy Dutch accent.  His parents were survivors of the Holocaust, and he was their only child, their only precious child.  His mama was a strikingly beautiful woman, with long thick glossy black hair pulled into a perfect bun.  A couple of years later when we were in Mrs. Doris Huffer Hutton's band class, Dave sat next to me - I on my flute and he on his violin.  His parents would often appear at the open door of the band room, and just silently watch, rarely if ever diverting their eyes from him, as the treasure that he obviously was to them.  I've never forgotten the quiet eloquence of those moments, nor the force with which they touched me.

   The family moved somewhere or other before we reached the eighth grade.  I've often wondered about them. 

   "Anyone? Anyone?"


     From Mark Hutcherson ('66) of VA - 02/28/13 (but only just found...) - "How to assemble a jeep":

You've got to see this.

About 8 soldiers pull up on a main street in Halifax, Nova Scotia on some holiday. They're in a standard issue WWII type Willys Jeep.  In the span of about 5 to 6 minutes they completely disassemble the vehicle and reassemble it and drive off in it fully operable - the idea being to show the genius that went into the making of the jeep and its basic simplicity.  Fantastic.

http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=lgwF8mdQwlw&feature=player_embedded

   WOWZERONI! Just think how impressive these skills will look listed on their resumes! Thanks, Mark!


      From Don Jett (NNHS / Warwick HS - '60) of FL - 03/03/13 - "Fantastic!!! Turn Speakers Up!!":

This is something I think you will really enjoy.....
 
Don
 
‘In God We Trust’

http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=pLgJ7pk0X-s  - by the Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain

   OOOH! Thanks, Don - you're right, I do! Ennio Morricone's music is unforgettable, and this version by the Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain is delightful!

http://www.ukuleleorchestra.com/main/home.aspx

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ukulele_Orchestra_of_Great_Britain

   Here are a couple more of their videos:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTIv8hP-UIA - Medley

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PfK-UzQ48JE - Shaft


From John Patterson ('59) of TN - 03/03/13 - "EXCELLENT Old Farmer's Advice":

Your readers might enjoy reading these words from a wise old farmer - - they may even consider printing and placing this in a prominent place so that they could see them every day!

Old Farmer's Advice:

Your fences need to be horse-high, pig-tight and bull-strong.

Keep skunks and bankers at a distance.

Life is simpler when you plow around the stump.

A bumble bee is considerably faster than a John Deere tractor.

Words that soak into your ears are whispered... not yelled.

Meanness don't just happen overnight.

Forgive your enemies; it messes up their heads.

Do not corner something that you know is meaner than you.

It don't take a very big person to carry a grudge.

You cannot unsay a cruel word.

Every path has a few puddles.

When you wallow with pigs, expect to get dirty.

The best sermons are lived, not preached.

Most of the stuff people worry about ain't never gonna happen anyway.

Don't judge folks by their relatives.

Remember that silence is sometimes the best answer.

Live a good, honorable life... Then when you get older and think back, you'll enjoy it a second time.

Don't interfere with something that ain't bothering you none.

Timing has a lot to do with the outcome of a Rain dance.

If you find yourself in a hole, the first thing to do is stop digging.

Sometimes you get, and sometimes you get got.

The biggest troublemaker you'll probably ever have to deal with, watches you from the mirror every morning.

Always drink upstream from the herd.

Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.

Lettin' the cat outta the bag is a whole lot easier than putting it back in.

If you get to thinking you're a person of some influence, try ordering somebody else's dog around..

Live simply. Love generously. Care deeply.

Speak kindly. Leave the rest to God.

Don't pick a fight with an old man. If he is too old to fight, he'll just kill you.
 

     These are positively delicious, John! Thanks so much! Any one of these thoughts could be made into a charming cross-stitch sampler as well - especially that last one!


From My Friend, Ed, of NC - 03/02/13 - "Two Voices":

  Thank you so much, Ed!
 
 


  From Bill Wynne ('63) of MD - 03/01/13 - "If Dogs Worked in Offices... (#3 in a Series of 17)":

      These are hysterical, Bill - thanks!
Secretary
 


BONUS BACK AND FORTH CROCHET TUTORIAL:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7MeXJCd2jc - How to Crochet with Two Colors Back and Forth


BONUS MARCH RECIPES:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes-and-cooking/recipe-of-the-day-what-to-cook-in-march/pictures/index.html - Food Network's What to Cook in March


FINALLY:

From www.ajokeaday.com - 03/03/13:

A forester and a lawyer were in car accident and showed up at the pearly gates together.

St. Peter greets them at the pearly gates and takes them to the homes where they will spend all of eternity. They get into St. Peter's holy vehicle and head on down a gold road, which turns into a platinum road, which turns onto an even grander road paved with diamonds, to a huge mansion where St. Peter turns to the lawyer and says, here is your home for the rest of eternity, enjoy! And if there is anything you need, just let me know.

Then St. Peter took the forester to his home, back down the diamond studded boulevard, down the platinum highway, down the street of gold, down an avenue of silver, along a stone alley and down an unpaved footpath to a shack. St Peter says, "Here you go" and goes to leave when the forester says "Wait minute! How come the lawyer gets the big mansion and I get this shack?"

St. Peter says: "Well, Foresters are a dime a dozen here, we have never had a lawyer before."


DATES TO REMEMBER:

1. Thursday, March 7, 2013 - The NNHS Class of 1955 holds Lunch Bunch gatherings on the first Thursday of every month at Steve & John's Steak House on Jefferson Avenue just above Denbigh Boulevard in Newport News at 11:00 AM. The luncheon is not limited to just the Class of '55; if you have friends in that year, go visit with them.

2. Wednesday, April 10, 2013 - The NNHS Class of June 1942 meets at noon on the second Wednesday of every other month for a Dutch treat lunch at the James River Country Club, 1500 Country Club Road. PLEASE JOIN THEM. Give or take a few years makes no difference. Good conversation, food and atmosphere. For details, call Jennings Bryan at 803-7701 for reservations.

3. Friday and Saturday, October 4 and 5, 2013 - The NNHS Class of 1963 will hold their 50-Year Reunion at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, Hampton on the Water. SEE: The website which has been set up for their class at www.nnhs1963.com; CONTACT: Frank Gibson, frankgibson@cox.net, Joyce Williams Nettles, joywnet@cox.net, or Susie Overton Jones, tnsjones@charter.net


PRAYER ROLL:

http://www.nnhs65.com/requests-prayers.html - updated 03/02/13

BLOG:

http://nnhs.wordpress.com/ - updated 03/13/11



  
Y'all take care of each other!  TYPHOONS FOREVER!  We'll Always Have Buckroe!

                                 Love to all, Carol

==============================================

NNHS CLASS OF '65 WEB SITE: http://www.nnhs65.com

PERSONAL WEB SITE: http://www.angelfire.com/weird2/cluckmeat

==============================================
 



Carol Buckley Harty
7020 Lure Court
Fayetteville, NC 28311-9309
915-780-3048
 


THREE WAYS TO DONATE:  

1. Visit the main page (http://www.nnhs65.com), scroll halfway down, and click on the Pay Pal Donate Button (nnhs65@gmail.com);

2. Go to www.PayPal.com, log in, select "Send Money (Services) to nnhs65@gmail.com; or

3. Just mail it directly to my home. Thanks!    
             


Radetzky March

- Johann Strauss I
(14 Mar 1804 - 25 Sept 1849)


"Radetzky March" midi courtesy of http://www.laurasmidiheaven.com/00-MIDI/2/000000000551/Radetzky%20March - 03/04/09

March 2013 Calendar courtesy of http://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/?year=2009&country=1 - 03/04/13

Divider Line clip art courtesy of http://www.wtv-zone.com/nevr2l82/bars1.html - 03/03/09 (but probably used previously as well.....)

Animated Tiny Birthday Cake clip art courtesy of Sarah Puckett Kressaty ('65) of VA - 08/31/05
Thanks, Sarah Sugah!

Navy Seal clip art courtesy of http://www.onemileup.com/miniSeals.asp - 05/29/06

Marine Corps Seal clip art courtesy of the late Herbert Hice of MI - one of my Famous Marines who served in the South Pacific during WWII.
Thanks again, Herbie!!

Army Seal clip art courtesy of Al Farber ('64) of GA - 05/24/06 (still missing...)
Thanks, Al!
Replaced by Norm Covert ('61) of MD - 02/09/09
Thanks, Norm!

Animated Laughing Frog courtesy of Wayne Stokes ('65) of VA - 07/16/08
Thanks, Wayne!

Animated Wildly Laughing Dog courtesy of Eva Ellis Madagan ('61) of FL - 11/24/07
Thanks, Eva!

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