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01/16/18 - NNHS Newsletter - Edelweiss

“I will be the gladdest thing
Under the sun!
I will touch a hundred flowers
And not pick one.” 

- Edna St. Vincent Millay, “Afternoon on a Hill” 
(28 Feb 1892 - 19 Oct 1950)

Dear Friends and Schoolmates, 

   I love this song.

BONUS - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sFHujvkacNY - Edelweiss - Bill Lee dubbing for Christopher Plummer


From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edelweiss_%28song%29

"Edelweiss" is a show tune from the 1959 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical The Sound of Music. It is named after the edelweiss, a white flower found high in the Alps. It is sung by Captain Georg Ludwig von Trapp and his family during the concert near the end of Act II as a defiant statement of Austrian patriotism in the face of the pressure put upon him to join the navy of Nazi Germany. In the 1965 film adaptation, the song is also sung by the Captain earlier in the film as he rediscovers music and a love for his children.

While The Sound of Music was in tryouts in Boston, Richard Rodgers felt Captain von Trapp should have a song with which he would bid farewell to the Austria he knew and loved. He and Oscar Hammerstein II decided to write an extra song that Captain von Trapp would sing in the Kaltzberg Festival (Salzburg Festival in the film) concert sequence towards the end of the show. As they were writing it, they felt that this song could also utilise the guitar-playing and folk-singing talents of Theodore Bikel, who created the role of Captain von Trapp on Broadway. The Lindsay and Crouse script provides a metaphor of the edelweiss flower, as a symbol of the Austria that Captain von Trapp, Maria and their children knew would live on in their hearts despite the Nazi annexation of their homeland. As such, the metaphor of this song builds on an earlier scene when Gretl presents a bouquet of edelweiss flowers to Elsa Schraeder during her visit to the von Trapp household. Rodgers provided a haunting waltz-time melody to the simple lyric that Hammerstein wrote about the appearance of the edelweiss flower. This song turned out to be one of the most beloved songs in the musical, and also one of the best-loved songs of Rodgers and Hammerstein.

This song was the last song that Rodgers and Hammerstein wrote together; Hammerstein was suffering from stomach cancer,[1] which would take his life nine months after The Sound of Music opened on Broadway.

Although the stage production uses the song only during the concert sequence, Ernest Lehman's screenplay for the film adaptation uses the song twice. Lehman created a scene that makes extra use of the song. This scene, inspired by a line in the original script by Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse, calls for Captain von Trapp to sing this song with his children in their family drawing room and rediscover the love he felt for them. Lehman also expanded the scope of the song when it was sung in the Salzburg Festival concert scene so that Captain von Trapp and his family would call the crowds to join in the song with him, in defiance of the Nazi soldiers posted around the arena. It is interesting to note that one of the Nazi commandants is shown singing in a baritone, revealing that he cares more for Austria than for the Reich.

The great popularity of the song has led many of its audience to believe that it is an Austrian folk song or even the official national anthem.[2] The New York Times and The Guardian have both reported that Ronald Reagan had it performed for an emissary of Austria when he visited the United States, believing it to be their national anthem.[3] However, Austria's official anthem is "Land der Berge, Land am Strome" and the anthem used before the Anschluss was "Sei gesegnet ohne Ende". The edelweiss is a popular flower in Austria and was featured on the old 1 Schilling coin. It can also now be seen on the 2 cent Euro coin. The flower is protected in Austria and illegal to pick. An "edelweiss" is also worn as a cap device by certain Austrian Army and all German Gebirgsjäger [4] (Mountain Troopers, literal translation Mountain Hunters) Units.

There is similar confusion about another song co-authored by Hammerstein, "Ol' Man River" from the musical Showboat, which is widely misbelieved to be a Negro spiritual.[5] The similarity in misconception about the two songs has been noted by two writers, both of whom see it as as tribute to Hammerstein's talents. Alyson McLamore in her book Musical theater: an appreciation writes "The last song to be written for the show was "Edelweiss," a tender little homage to a native flower of Austria that has the effect of authentic Austrian folksong, much as "Ol' Man River" struck listeners as a genuine African American spiritual"[6] Hugh Fordin in his biography of Oscar Hammerstein speaks of "the ability of the authors to simulate the quality of an authentic folk song..."Ol' Man River" had the ring of a black laborer's song...Thirty years later "Edelweiss was widely believed to be an old Austrian song, though Oscar...composed it for the Sound of Music."[7]


THIS WEEK'S BIRTHDAYS:
 
   Happy Birthday today to  Johanne Coates Richardson ('57) AND   Howard Smith ('63) of VA AND Steve Kiger ('66) of VA!

   Happy Birthday tomorrow to  Chuck Anspach ('60) of NC!

   Happy Birthday this week to:

18 - Eileen Rash Vaught ('57) AND F.A. Saunders (Hampton HS - '64) of VA;

20 - Ware Morrison ('63) of VA;

21 - Carol Collier Sparrow ('63) of VA;

22 -  Bruce Sims ('56) of VA AND Carolyn Clark Wilt ('57) AND Sandra Sherman Filippo ('57) AND   the late Norman Dick ('60) (deceased 26 Nov 2015) AND Rochelle Spooner ('63) of NY;

23 -   Chandler Nelms (Hampton HS - '63) of MD!

   Many Happy Returns to You All!

http://www.nnhs65.com/Happy-Birthday.html 


THIS DAY IN WWII:

January 16, 1944 - Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower took command of the Allied invasion force in London.

January 16, 1945 - Adolf Hitler moved into his underground bunker, the so-called Führerbunker.


THIS DAY IN 1968:

Tuesday, January 16, 1968
- Author Rebecca Stead was born in New York City, New York.

Tuesday, January 16, 1968 - The founder of Bob Jones University, evangelist Bob Jones Sr. (b. Robert Reynolds  Jones on 30 Oct 1883 in Dale County, Alabama), died in Greenville, South Carolina at the age of 84.

Tuesday, January 16, 1968 - Archaeologist and judge Panagiotis Poulitsas (Παναγιώτης Πουλίτσας) (b. 1881 in Geraki, Laconia, Greece) died in Athens, Greece.


 


“Don’t be gloomy. Do not dwell on unkind things. Stop seeking out the storms and enjoy more fully the sunlight. Even if you are not happy, put a smile on your face. ‘Accentuate the positive.’ Look a little deeper for the good. Go forward in life with a twinkle in your eye and a smile on your face, with great and strong purpose in your heart. Love life.”

- Gordon B. Hinckley, July 2001
(23 June 1910 - 27 Jan 2008)



 


From Joan Lauterbach Krause ('60) of VA - 01/16/18:

   Thank you, Joan!
 
 


 


From the Best Dressed Boy in the Class of 1966, Don Chaney of FL - 01/15/18:

Carol,

I do not know what changed but the last several correspondences that you emailed I could open and edit. Pretty weird? I believe that you had hyperlinks but not the case.

Don

   Oh, Donnie, NO! What fresh technical horror can this be??

   This time I know that it involves settings on your PC or iPad rather than mine, as   Joe Madagan was in the very same mailing batch as you, and his reached him and cooperated just fine, as evidenced below.

   Do any of you National Smart People know what might be causing this, and what Don can do to resolve it? Thank you!


 


  From Joe Madagan ('57) of FL - 01/15/18 - "Newsletter - 'It's Always You'":

Hi, TYPHOON Conduit:

That post by
     Paul Harty is spot on for Florida. Got a good chuckle out of it. Hope he is better...

TYPHOON Regards,
Joe Madagan ('57) of FL

   Thank you, Adonis! We hope he's getting better, too! 


 


 From My Niece, Shari, of VA - 01/15/18 - "RIP Dolores O'Riordan (Cranberries)":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xar6AFEYpZg
She sang with such passion and conviction and had a beautiful voice. Sad her time on earth came so early, at age 46. Zombie is a song most will recognize.

http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-42696376

   Thank you, Shari, gone too soon, that's for certain!


From John Patterson ('59) of TN - 01/15/18 - "This is Why I Forward Stuff":

This is a good one for my friends!

John

============================================================================

An old cowboy was riding his trusty horse along a strange and unfamiliar trail, followed by his faithful dog.

The cowboy was enjoying the new and different scenery, when he suddenly remembered dying and realized he was dead and the dog beside him had been dead for years, as had his horse. Confused, he wondered what was happening, and where the trail was leading them.

After a while, they came to a high, white stone wall that looked like fine marble. At the top of a long hill, the wall was broken by a tall arch topped by a golden letter "H" that glowed in the sunlight.

Standing before it, he saw a magnificent gate in the arch that looked like mother-of-pearl, and the street that led to the gate looked like gold.

He rode toward the gate, and as he got closer, he saw a man at a desk to one side.

Thirsty and tired by his journey, he called out, "Excuse me, where are we?"

"This is Heaven, sir," the man answered.

"Wow! Would you happen to have some water?" the cowboy asked.

"Of course, sir. Come right in, and I'll have some ice water brought right up."

As the gate began to open, the cowboy asked, "Can I bring my partners, too?"

"I'm sorry, sir, but we don't accept pets."

The cowboy thought for a moment, then turned around and headed back to the trail and continued riding, his dog trotting by his side.

Several hours later, at the top of another hill, he came to a dirt lane leading through a ranch gate that looked as if it had never been closed. As he approached the gate, he saw a man inside, leaning against a tree and reading a book.

"Excuse me," he called to the man. "Do you have any water?"

"Sure, there's a pump right over there. Help yourself."

"How about my friends here?" The cowboy gestured to the dog and his horse.

"Of course! They look thirsty, too," said the man.

The trio went through the gate, and sure enough, there was an old-fashioned hand pump with buckets beside it. The old cowboy filled a cup and the buckets with wonderfully cool water and took a long drink, as did his horse and dog.

When they finished drinking, he walked back to the man who was still standing by the tree. "What do you call this place?" the cowboy asked.

"This is Heaven," he was told.

"I'm confused" the cowboy said. "The fella down the road said that was Heaven, too."

"Oh, you mean the place with the glitzy, gold street and fake pearly gates? That's hell."

"Doesn't it make you angry when they use your name like that?"

"Not at all. Actually, we're happy they screen out the folks who would leave their best friends behind."


Sometimes, we wonder why friends forward things to us without writing a word.

Maybe this explains it:

When you're busy, but still want to keep in touch, you can forward emails. When you have nothing to say, but still want to keep in contact, you can forward jokes. When you have something to say, but don't know exactly how, you can forward stuff.

A 'forward' lets you know you're still remembered, still important, still cared about.

So the next time you get a 'forward,' don't think of it as just another joke. Realize you've been thought of today and your friend on the other end just wanted to send you a smile.

P.S. You're welcome at my watering hole anytime.

   Thank you, John - and you, at mine!


 


     From My Husband, Paul Harty (Bardolph HS, IL - '61) of NC - 01/15/18 - "The Old Breed by Victor Davis Hanson":

A Toast To The Old Breed
 
Wednesday, November 22, 2017

The late World War II combat veteran and memoirist E. B. Sledge enshrined his generation of fellow Marines as “The Old Breed” in his gripping account of the hellish battle of Okinawa. Now, most of those who fought in World War II are either dead or in their nineties.

Much has been written about the disappearance of these members of the Greatest Generation—there are now over 1,000 veterans passing away per day. Of the 16 million who at one time served in the American military during World War II, only about a half-million are still alive.

Military historians, of course, lament the loss of their first-hand recollections of battle. The collective memories of these veterans were never systematically recorded and catalogued. Yet even in haphazard fashion, their stories of dropping into Sainte-Mère-Église or surviving a sinking Liberty ship in the frigid North Atlantic have offered correctives about the war otherwise impossible to attain from the data of national archives.

More worrisome, however, is that the collective ethos of the World War II generation is fading. It may not have been fully absorbed by the Baby Boomer generation and has not been fully passed on to today’s young adults, the so-called Millennials. While U.S. soldiers proved heroic and lethal in Afghanistan and Iraq, their sacrifices were never commensurately appreciated by the larger culture.

The generation that came of age in the 1940s had survived the poverty of the Great Depression to win a global war that cost 60 million lives, while participating in the most profound economic and technological transformation in human history as a once rural America metamorphosed into a largely urban and suburban culture of vast wealth and leisure.

Their achievement from 1941 to 1945 remains unprecedented. The United States on the eve of World War II had an army smaller than Portugal’s. It finished the conflict with a global navy larger than all of the fleets of the world put together. By 1945, America had a GDP equal to those of Germany, Japan, the Soviet Union, and the British Empire combined. With a population 50 million people smaller than that of the USSR, the United States fielded a military of roughly the same size.

America almost uniquely fought at once in the Pacific, Asia, the Mediterranean, and Europe, on and beneath the seas, in the skies, and on land. On the eve of the war, America’s military and political leaders, still traumatized by the Great Depression, fought bitterly over modest military appropriations, unsure of whether the country could afford even a single additional aircraft carrier or another small squadron of B-17s. Yet four years later, civilians had built 120 carriers of various types and were producing a B-24 bomber at the rate of one an hour at the Willow Run factory in Michigan. Such vast changes are still difficult to appreciate.

Certainly, what was learned through poverty and mayhem by those Americans born in the 1920s became invaluable in the decades following the war. The World War II cohort was a can-do generation who believed that they did not need to be perfect to be good enough. The strategic and operational disasters of World War II—the calamitous daylight bombing campaign of Europe in 1942-43, the quagmire of the Heurtgen Forest, or being surprised at the Battle of Bulge—hardly demoralized these men and women.

Miscalculations and follies were not blame-gamed or endlessly litigated, but were instead seen as tragic setbacks on the otherwise inevitable trajectory to victory. When we review their postwar technological achievements—from the interstate highway system and California Water Project to the Apollo missions and the Lockheed SR-71 flights—it is difficult to detect comparable confidence and audacity in subsequent generations. To paraphrase Nietzsche, anything that did not kill those of the Old Breed generation made them stronger and more assured.

As an ignorant teenager, I once asked my father whether the war had been worth it. After all, I smugly pointed out, the “victory” had ensured the postwar empowerment and global ascendance of the Soviet Union. My father had been a combat veteran during the war, flying nearly 40 missions over Japan as the central fire control gunner in a B-29. He replied in an instant, “You win the battle in front of you and then just go on to the next.”

I wondered where his assurance came. Fourteen of 16 planes—each holding eleven crewmen—in his initial squadron of bombers were lost to enemy action or mechanical problems. The planes were gargantuan, problem-plagued, and still experimental—and some of them also simply vanished on the 3,000-mile nocturnal flight over the empty Pacific from Tinian to Tokyo and back.

As a college student, I once pressed him about my cousin and his closest male relative, Victor Hanson, a corporal of the Sixth Marine Division who was killed on the last day of the assault on Sugar Loaf Hill on Okinawa. Wasn’t the unimaginative Marine tactic of plowing straight ahead through entrenched and fortified Japanese positions insane? He answered dryly, “Maybe, maybe not. But the enemy was in the way, then Marines took them out, and they were no longer in the way.”

My father, William F. Hanson, died when I was 45 and I still recall his advice whenever I am at an impasse, personally or professionally. “Just barrel ahead onto the next mission.” Such a spirit, which defined his generation, is the antithesis of the therapeutic culture that is the legacy of my generation of Baby Boomers—and I believe it explains everything from the spectacular economic growth of the 1960s to the audacity of landing a man on the moon.

On rare occasions over the last thirty years, I’ve run into hard-left professors who had been combat pilots over Germany or fought the Germans in Italy. I never could quite muster the energy to oppose them; they seemed too earnest and too genuine in what I thought were their mistaken views. I mostly kept quiet, recalling Pericles’s controversial advice that a man’s combat service and sacrifice for his country should wash away his perceived blemishes. Perhaps it’s an amoral and illogical admonition, but it has nonetheless stayed with me throughout the years. It perhaps explains why I look at John F. Kennedy’s personal foibles in a different light from those similar excesses of Bill Clinton. A man, I tend to think, should be judged by his best moments rather than his worst ones.

Growing up with a father, uncles, and cousins who struggled to maintain our California farm during the Depression and then fought in an existential war was a constant immersion in their predominantly tragic view of life. Most were chain smokers, ate and drank too much, drove too fast, avoided doctors, and were often impulsive—as if in their fifties and sixties, they were still prepping for another amphibious assault or day-time run over the Third Reich. Though they viewed human nature with suspicion, they were nonetheless upbeat—their Homeric optimism empowered by an acceptance of a man’s limitations during his brief and often tragic life. Time was short; but heroism was eternal. “Of course you can” was their stock reply to any hint of uncertainty about a decision. The World War II generation had little patience with subtlety, or even the suggestion of indecision—how could it when such things would have gotten them killed at Monte Cassino or stalking a Japanese convoy under the Pacific in a submarine?

After the stubborn poverty and stasis of the Great Depression, the Old Breed saw the challenge of World War II as redemptive—a pragmatic extension of President Franklin Roosevelt news-conference confession that the “Old Dr. New Deal” had been supplanted by the new “Dr. Win-the-War” in restoring prosperity.

One lesson of the war on my father’s generation was that dramatic action was always preferable to incrementalism, even if that meant that the postwar “best and brightest” would sometimes plunge into unwise policies at home or misadventures abroad. Another lesson the World War II generation learned—a lesson now almost forgotten—was that perseverance and its twin courage were the most important of all collective virtues. What was worse than a bad war was losing it. And given their sometimes tragic view of human nature, the Old Breed believed that winning changed a lot of minds, as if the policy itself was not as important as the appreciation that it was working.

In reaction to the stubborn certainty of our fathers, we of the Baby Boomer generation prided ourselves on introspection, questioning authority, and nuance. We certainly saw doubt and uncertainty as virtues rather than vices—but not necessarily because we saw these traits as correctives to the excesses of the GIs. Rather, as one follows the trajectory of my generation, whose members are now in their sixties and seventies, it is difficult not to conclude that we were contemplative and critical mostly because we could be—our mindset being the product of a far safer, more prosperous, and leisured society that did not face the existential challenges of those who bequeathed such bounty to us. Had the veterans of Henry Kaiser’s shipyards been in charge of California’s high-speed rail project, they would have built on time and on budget, rather than endlessly litigating various issues as costs soared in pursuit of a mythical perfection.

The logical conclusion of our cohort’s emphasis on “finding oneself” and discovering an “inner self” is the now iconic ad of a young man in pajamas sipping hot chocolate while contemplating signing up for government health insurance. Such, it seems, is the arrested millennial mindset. The man-child ad is just 70 years removed from the eighteen-year-olds who fought and died on Guadalcanal and above Schweinfurt, but that disconnect now seems like an abyss over centuries. One cannot loiter one’s mornings away when there is a plane to fly or a tank to build. I am not sure that presidents Franklin Roosevelt, Harry Truman, and Dwight Eisenhower were always better men than were presidents Bill Clinton, Barack Obama, and Donald Trump, but they were certainly bigger in the challenges they faced and the spirit in which they met them.

This Thanksgiving, let us give a toast to the millions who are no longer with us and the thousands who will soon depart this earth. They gave us a world far better than they inherited.
 

  WOW. Thank you, Haul Party!


 


“I told my psychiatrist that everyone hates me. He said I was being ridiculous - everyone hasn't met me yet.”

- Rodney Dangerfield
(22 Nov 1921 - 05 Oct 2004)



 


 From Bill Hobbs ('66) of Northern VA - 01/04/18 - "THIS AND THAT (#4 in a Series of 8)":
 

  SO TRUE! Thanks, Billy!
 
 


 


BONUS EDELWEISS CROCHET PATTERN:

Edelweiss Crochet Flower Pattern

 


BONUS EDELWEISS KNIT PATTERN:

Pam Allen's Knitted Edelweiss Blanket - "An heirloom-worthy piece doesn’t have to be fussy or complicated, and Pam Allen’s summer-weight blanket is a perfect example of this. Knitted in soft wool/silk Tern, the allover leaf lace motif has a peaceful, meditative rhythm to it, with ribbed framework to polish off its quilt-like texture." - Not really free; the pattern download is $6.00.


BONUS AUSTRIAN RECIPES:

http://allrecipes.com/recipes/world-cuisine/european/austrian/ - Austrian Foods


FINALLY:

From www.ajokeaday.com - 01/15/17:

To the irritation of the judge, a man was trying to be excused from jury duty.

"Tell me," began the judge, "is there any good reason why you cannot serve as a juror in the trial?"

The man replied, "I don't want to be away from my job that long."

"Can't they do without you at work?" demanded the judge.

"Yes," admitted the juror. "But I don't want them to realize it."


DATES TO REMEMBER:
1. Every Tuesday, 7:30 AM - Male grads meet at Angelo's Restaurant on J. Clyde Morris Boulevard for breakfast and camaraderie.

2. Wednesday, March 14, 2018 -The NNHS Class of June 1942 meets at noon on the second Wednesday of every other month for a Dutch treat lunch at the James River Country Club, 1500 Country Club Road. PLEASE JOIN THEM. Give or take a few years makes no difference. Good conversation, food and atmosphere. For details, call Jennings Bryan at 803-7701 for
reservations.


PRAYER ROLL:

http://www.nnhs65.com/requests-prayers.html - updated 01/12/18

BLOG:

http://nnhs.wordpress.com/ - updated 03/13/11


   Y'all take good care of each other!  TYPHOONS FOREVER!  We'll Always Have Buckroe!

                          Love to all, Carol
 

==============================================

NNHS CLASS OF '65 WEB SITE: http://www.nnhs65.com

PERSONAL WEB SITE: http://www.angelfire.com/weird2/cluckmeat

==============================================


Carol Buckley Harty
7020 Lure Court
Fayetteville, NC 28311-9309
910-584-8802

"Never underestimate
the power of a drop
in the bucket."

THREE WAYS TO DONATE:  

1. Visit the main page (http://www.nnhs65.com), scroll halfway down, and click on the Pay Pal Donate Button (nnhs65@gmail.com);

2. Go to www.PayPal.com, log in, select "Send Money (Services) to nnhs65@gmail.com; or

3. Just mail it directly to my home. Thanks! 



Edelweiss

Music by Richard Rodgers (28 June 1902 - 30 Dec 1979)

Lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II (12 July 1895 - 30 Aug 1960)

- The Sound of Music, 1959
 

CAPTAIN:
Edelweiss, Edelweiss
Every morning you greet me
Small and white clean and bright
You look happy to meet me
Blossom of snow may you bloom and grow
Bloom and grow forever
Edelweiss, Edelweiss
Bless my homeland forever.

CAPTAIN, MARIA, THE CHILDREN AND CHORUS:
Small and white clean and bright
You look happy to meet me
Blossom of snow may you bloom and grow
Bloom and grow forever
Edelweiss, Edelweiss
Bless my homeland forever


"Edelweiss" midi courtesy of http://alien98.tripod.com/show.htm - 01/18/11 (sic)

  "Edelweiss" lyrics courtesy of http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/r/rodgers_and_hammerstein/edelweiss.html - 01/18/11 (sic)

Image of Edelweiss courtesy of - http://ubiquitous-ly.com/tag/ideas/ - 01/18/11 (sic)

Flower Bar 59 Divider Line  clip art courtesy of http://www.angelfire.com/pa/FlaminJune/Flowerlines4.html - 01/19/11 (sic)

Animated Tiny Birthday Cake clip art courtesy of Sarah Puckett Kressaty ('65) of VA - 08/31/05
Thanks, Sarah Sugah!

Hampton High School's Crab clip art courtesy of http://www.geocities.com/agent99bm/ - 10/02/05
Replaced courtesy of http://www.hamptonhigh1964.com - 02/17/09

Animated Army Flag clip art courtesy of http://www.angelfire.com/ny4/KevsGifsGalore/Patriotic.html - 06/18/03     

Bad Surprise Smiley courtesy of http://picsdigger.com/image/a935ccd3/ - 10/21/10

Army Seal clip art courtesy of Al Farber ('64) of GA - 05/24/06 (still missing...)
Thanks, Al!
Replaced by Norm Covert ('61) of MD - 02/09/09
Thanks, Norm!

Navy Seal clip art courtesy of http://www.onemileup.com/miniSeals.asp - 05/29/06 

Jeffrey Holman's Image "A Drop in the Bucket" courtesy of https://tearsfromalonelygod.wordpress.com/2009/10/08/a-drop-in-the-bucket/ - 05/23/16

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